Great Britain: Foreign Policy and the Span of Empire, 1689-1971: A Documentary History - Vol. 2

By Joel H. Wiener | Go to book overview

UNION WITH GREAT BRITAIN

Renunciation Act, an Act for Preventing and Removing Doubts Concerning
the Exclusive Rights of the Parliament and Courts
of Ireland in Matters of Legislation and Judicature
(23 Geo. III, c. 28), January 1783*

“Whereas, by an Act of the last Session of this present Parliament (intituled, An Act to repeal an Act made in the sixth Year of the Reign of his late Majesty King George the First, intituled, An Act for the better Securing the Dependency of the Kingdom of Ireland upon the Crown of Great Britain), it was enacted, That the said last mentioned Act, and all Matters and Things therein contained, should be repealed: And whereas Doubts have arisen whether the Provisions of the said Act are sufficient to secure to the People of Ireland the Rights claimed by them to be bound only by Laws enacted by his Majesty and the Parliament of that Kingdom, in all Cases whatever, and to have all Actions and Suits at Law or in Equity, which may be instituted in that Kingdom, decided in his Majesty’s Courts therein finally, and without Appeal from thence: Therefore, for removing all Doubts respecting the same,” May it please your Majesty that it may be declared and enacted; and be it declared and enacted by the King’s most Excellent Majesty, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the Authority of the same, That the said Right claimed by the People of Ireland to be bound only by Laws enacted by his Majesty and the Parliament of that Kingdom, in all Cases whatever, and to have all Actions and Suits at Law or in Equity, which may be instituted in that Kingdom, decided in his Majesty’s Courts therein finally, and without Appeal from thence, shall be, and it is hereby declared to be established and ascertained for ever, and shall at no Time hereafter, be questioned or questionable.

II. And be it further enacted by the Authority aforesaid, That no Writ of Error or Appeal shall be received or adjudged, or any other Proceeding be had by or in any of his Majesty’s Courts in this Kingdom, in any Action or Suit at Law or in Equity, instituted in any of his Majesty’s Courts in the Kingdom of Ireland; and that all such Writs, Appeals, or Proceedings, shall be, and they are hereby declared null and void to all Intents and Purposes; and that all Records, Transcripts of Records of Proceedings, which have been transmitted from Ireland to Great Britain, by virtue of any Writ of Error or Appeal, and upon which no Judgment has been given or Decree pronounced before the first Day of June, one thousand and seven hundred and eighty-two, shall, upon Application made by or in behalf of the Party in whose Favour Judgment was given, or Decree pronounced, in Ireland, be delivered to such Party, or any Person by him authorised to apply for and receive the same.

* Statutes at Large, XIV, 320–21.

-1515-

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Great Britain: Foreign Policy and the Span of Empire, 1689-1971: A Documentary History - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Rearmament Question 875
  • Policy of Appeasement 946
  • Failure of Appeasement and the Outbreak of War 1044
  • World War II and Postwar Problems - 1940-Present 1081
  • Churchill Becomes Prime Minister 1086
  • Winning the War 1113
  • The Postwar Settlement 1192
  • The Cold War 1217
  • Policy toward Asia 1287
  • Nuclear and Defense Policies 1326
  • Britain and the Common Market 1390
  • Ireland 1467
  • The Conquest of Ireland 1473
  • Removal of Economic Restrictions 1490
  • Union with Great Britain 1515
  • Movement for Repeal of the Union 1527
  • Domestic Reforms 1554
  • Irish Peasantry and the Land Problem 1629
  • Young Ireland Movement 1744
  • Disestablishment of the Church of Ireland 1749
  • Home Rule Movement 1784
  • Partition of Ireland 1843
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