Great Britain: Foreign Policy and the Span of Empire, 1689-1971: A Documentary History - Vol. 2

By Joel H. Wiener | Go to book overview

YOUNG IRELAND MOVEMENT

Speech by Viscount Stanley in the House of Lords
Attacking the United Irishman, a Newspaper
Edited by John Mitchel 24 February 1848*

My Lords, with the permission of the noble Lord on the Woolsack, whose notice of Motion stands before mine upon the paper, I now rise for the purpose of calling your attention to the publication of a paper in Ireland, of which I gave notice a few evenings ago. In doing so, I shall trouble your Lordships with very few observations of my own, because the whole of my case depends on the extracts from the paper itself, and on the result of the questions which I shall have to put to Her Majesty’s Government in connexion with them. It is only necessary to remind your Lordships, that in consequence of differences of opinion—not, indeed, as to the end aimed at, or the objects to be gained, but as to the mode of carrying them out—among the members composing the Repeal Associations, that body has been split into two sections, agreeing in their ultimate object, but entirely opposed as to the manner of effecting it. Of these two sections, the more prudent and cautious, acting on the principles of the policy which were pursued by Mr. O’Connell in his lifetime, and by his immediate followers since have adhered to the original body which meets in the miscalled Conciliation Hall. The more violent, anxious to take steps for the speedier attainment of their aims, have established a body which they term “The Irish Confederation.” In the Irish Confederation, again, there has been some collision of opinion, of various degrees of incaution and imprudence, with respect to the proper course to be pursued by them for the attainment of their views. Shortly after an early meeting of the Confederation, two letters were published, one from Mr. Mitchell, and the other from Mr. Reilly, which appeared, even to this body, to be of such a dangerous and seditious tendency, that they were the subject of discussion; and, in order to show the spirit by which the Confederation was animated, I may add that a division took place, and by a majority of 317 to 188 this publication of the letters was condemned as being imprudent and incautious. Mr. Mitchell in consequence withdrew from the Confederation, and established a paper on his own account, which appeared for the first time on the 1st of this month, under the title of the United Irishman, to which I now call attention. Before I quote any of the articles which it contains, permit me at the outset to show your Lordships the language of the moderate party of the Irish Confederation, reported in the same paper, and

* Hansard, 3.S., XCVI, 1242–47.

-1744-

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Great Britain: Foreign Policy and the Span of Empire, 1689-1971: A Documentary History - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Rearmament Question 875
  • Policy of Appeasement 946
  • Failure of Appeasement and the Outbreak of War 1044
  • World War II and Postwar Problems - 1940-Present 1081
  • Churchill Becomes Prime Minister 1086
  • Winning the War 1113
  • The Postwar Settlement 1192
  • The Cold War 1217
  • Policy toward Asia 1287
  • Nuclear and Defense Policies 1326
  • Britain and the Common Market 1390
  • Ireland 1467
  • The Conquest of Ireland 1473
  • Removal of Economic Restrictions 1490
  • Union with Great Britain 1515
  • Movement for Repeal of the Union 1527
  • Domestic Reforms 1554
  • Irish Peasantry and the Land Problem 1629
  • Young Ireland Movement 1744
  • Disestablishment of the Church of Ireland 1749
  • Home Rule Movement 1784
  • Partition of Ireland 1843
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