Great Britain: Foreign Policy and the Span of Empire, 1689-1971: A Documentary History - Vol. 2

By Joel H. Wiener | Go to book overview

HOME RULE MOVEMENT

Speech by Isaac Butt in the House of Commons
Moving the First Resolution for Irish Home Rule, 30 June 1874*

MR. BUTT rose to move the Resolution of which he had given Notice— “That this House resolve itself into a Committee of the Whole House, to consider the present Parliamentary relations between Great Britain and Ireland.” The hon. and learned Member said, that as a large number of the people of Ireland entertained the opinion that the present relations between the two countries were unsatisfactory, he felt that those opinions ought to be submitted to the consideration of this House. In the difficulties in which he was placed in bringing the question forward, he certainly had this support—that he knew he was addressing an audience that would give him every indulgence. He had already read the Motion which he intended to submit to the House, and if he were fortunate enough to obtain assent to it, and they went into Committee, he intended further to move—

That it is expedient and just to restore to the Irish Nation the right and
power of managing all exclusively Irish affairs in an Irish Parliament; and
that provision should be made at the same time for maintaining the
integrity of the Empire and the connection between the Countries by
reserving to this Imperial Parliament full and exclusive control over all
Imperial affairs.

Now, at the outset he would say a few words as to the form in which he had submitted his proposals, and he believed that in moving that the House resolve itself into Committee, he was strictly adhering to Parliamentary usage. This was the form which was repeatedly observed in olden times in reference to matters connected with the state of the nation. The question of Roman Catholic Emancipation was dealt with in this way; it was the course taken by the right hon. Gentleman the present Prime Minister in his Reform Bill, and later still the right hon. Member for Greenwich (Mr. Gladstone) followed his example in his Resolutions regarding the Irish Church. He did not wish to shelter himself in moving this first Resolution under any vague generalities; but he proposed at the same time to discuss the two Resolutions which he intended to follow if the House went into Committee. He believed his duty was to put the House, as far as possible, in possession of the fullest and most complete information as to the plan he intended to submit, the new arrangement he proposed in the place of that which now existed, and which he maintained was imperfect. He believed he was entitled to do this with some authority, for in the course of last autumn

*Hansard, 3.s., CCXX, 700–08, 716–17.

-1784-

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Great Britain: Foreign Policy and the Span of Empire, 1689-1971: A Documentary History - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Rearmament Question 875
  • Policy of Appeasement 946
  • Failure of Appeasement and the Outbreak of War 1044
  • World War II and Postwar Problems - 1940-Present 1081
  • Churchill Becomes Prime Minister 1086
  • Winning the War 1113
  • The Postwar Settlement 1192
  • The Cold War 1217
  • Policy toward Asia 1287
  • Nuclear and Defense Policies 1326
  • Britain and the Common Market 1390
  • Ireland 1467
  • The Conquest of Ireland 1473
  • Removal of Economic Restrictions 1490
  • Union with Great Britain 1515
  • Movement for Repeal of the Union 1527
  • Domestic Reforms 1554
  • Irish Peasantry and the Land Problem 1629
  • Young Ireland Movement 1744
  • Disestablishment of the Church of Ireland 1749
  • Home Rule Movement 1784
  • Partition of Ireland 1843
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