Welcome the Hour of Conflict: William Cowan McClellan and the 9th Alabama

By John C. Carter | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments and Dedication

I first heard of William Cowan McClellan while listening as a young boy to the stories my grandmother Carter told while on the front porch of her home in Pulaski, Tennessee. Nancy White Carter was not above stretching the truth a little bit about her favorite ancestor who was a veteran of Robert E. Lee’s army. According to her, William was seven feet tall and was captured on the Round Tops at Gettysburg, where he was putting his size to use as a signalman. She also mentioned that he had been sent to prison and had written letters home to his family. As William had no further history presented in his behalf, I always assumed that he had died in prison. Over the years I had remembered bits and pieces of the story that would come back to mind whenever someone brought up the subject of the family in the Civil War, but I never took the time to look into it further.

Some years later, having developed an interest in the history of the early Virginia frontier and its explorers of the seventeenth century, I had attempted to figure out the exact routes that many of these explorers had taken in crossing through the Virginia Colony. After running out of seventeenth-and eighteenth-century sources, I turned to letters and journals of Civil War soldiers who served in the area hoping they might shed some light on the problem. While the effort was not productive, it did revive my interest in the Civil War, and from a new perspective of the soldier and not the battlefield. I remembered my grandmother’s stories, and I wondered if the family still had the letters. About the same time, a visit to Gettysburg sent me scrambling to discover the regiment in which my ancestor had served.

A few years later at a Carter family reunion my aunt Polly Harwell Carter handed me a large shoe box tied up with a piece of string. She thought I might be interested in the contents of the box. Inside were photocopies of the Civil War letters of my great-great-grandfather

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Welcome the Hour of Conflict: William Cowan McClellan and the 9th Alabama
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 445

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.