Greenjobs: A Guide to Eco-Friendly Employment

By A. Bronwyn Llewellyn; James P. Hendrix et al. | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

In writing this volume, the authors have been continually astounded by the environmental revolution that is emerging worldwide. It is exciting, and sobering, to visualize the relationship between the battle against global warming and other environmental crises and the simultaneous creation of millions of jobs to relieve unemployment, underemployment, and other socioeconomic challenges. The massive volume of information, and the fact that it changes by the hour, has been daunting. You can’t glance at any form of media without seeing some reference to “green,” or global warming, or the environment. This movement constitutes a sea change, one that is nearly impossible to capture in a single comprehensive treatment. The best we can do is to dip our bucket into this fast-moving stream and examine that moment’s contents. Tomorrow—and next week—the view will be different. We hope, however, that our work provides a useful introduction to this potentially world-changing topic. It is exciting to witness its early stages and growth. As a job seeker, you have nearly limitless opportunities to participate.

While it seems clear that the green job sector will indeed be what former President Bill Clinton has called the biggest economic boom since this country mobilized for World War II, we are just at the start of this metamorphosis. As this book goes to press, both the United States and the world are on the cusp of an explosion of green jobs. The dramatic forecasts of huge numbers of jobs you’ll find in these pages come from the leading thinkers and participants—environmental and green job evangelists, if you will—working today. Far from hyperbole, we feel these predictions will come true.

We have benefited from the invaluable assistance of many people and organizations in the writing of this book. John Huie,

-iv-

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