Greenjobs: A Guide to Eco-Friendly Employment

By A. Bronwyn Llewellyn; James P. Hendrix et al. | Go to book overview

Chapter 3:
Who Wants a Green Job and Why

> You must be the change you wish to see in the world.
—Mahatma Gandhi

If you’re looking for a job—any job—you’ve no doubt scoured plenty of books and Web sites. If you’re looking for a job and picked up this book, perhaps something about the “green” in the title caught your eye.

There are many reasons you may be job hunting. You could be in college and deciding on your first career. You may be at a crossroads and ready to change careers. You may have been downsized, laid off, or your position outsourced overseas, and you would like work that won’t be obsolete, lost to attrition, or sent to workers in a foreign country in the near future. On Labor Day 2006, the Pew Research Center released the results of a social trends study that looked at how Americans feel about their jobs now compared to thirty years ago. About two-thirds of the respondents felt less job security and more stress, and nearly one-third thought someone overseas could do their job right now.

Perhaps you’re burned out or dissatisfied with your current job. A 2005 survey conducted by The Conference Board found that since 1995, overall job satisfaction decreased from 60 to 50 percent, and 25 percent of workers just showed up to collect a paycheck. In Greek mythology, the gods condemned Sisyphus to pushing an enormous boulder up a steep hill, only to have it roll back down. His fate was to repeat this frustrating, futile task into eternity. In an essay about the myth, Nobel Prize-winning writer Albert Camus decided that the struggle itself gave the task meaning and that Sisyphus was heroic and happy. From today’s perspective,

-27-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Greenjobs: A Guide to Eco-Friendly Employment
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 234

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.