When Writing Met Art: From Symbol to Story

By Denise Schmandt-Besserat | Go to book overview

NOTES

Introduction

1. Jack Goody, The Interface between the Written and the Oral, p. 298.

2. Ruth Mayer-Opificius, “Gedanken zur Bedeutung frühdynastischer Rundbilder,” p. 252.

3. Denise Schmandt-Besserat, Before Writing, pp. 35–48.

4. Denise Schmandt-Besserat, How Writing Came About, pp. 42–54.

5. Rainer M. Boehmer, Günter Dreyer, and Bernd Kromer, “Einige frühzeitliche 14CDatierungen aus Abydos und Uruk,” p. 64; Rainer Michael Boehmer, “14C-Daten aus Uruk und Abydos—Aegyptisches (?) im Frühen Nordsyrien, Sumer und Elam,” p. 223; Henry T. Wright and E. S. A. Rupley, “Calibrated Radiocarbon Age Determinations of Uruk-Related Assemblages,” pp. 91–93.

6. Schmandt-Besserat, How Writing Came About, pp. 55–85; Before Writing, pp. 128–139.

7. Schmandt-Besserat, Before Writing, pp. 110, 112–114, 130–132.

8. Schmandt-Besserat, How Writing Came About, pp. 61–62.

9. Jöran Friberg, The Third Millennium Roots of Babylonian Mathematics.

10. Harvey Weiss and T. Cuyler Young, Jr., “The Merchants of Susa; Godin V and the Plateau Lowlands Relations in the Late Fourth Millennium B.C.,” pp. 8–11.

11. G. van Driel, “Tablets from Jebel Aruda,” pp. 12–25.

12. Julius Jordan, Vorläufiger Bericht über die von der deutschen Forschungsgemeinschaft in Uruk-Warka unternommenen Ausgrabungen, Abhandlungen der preussiche Akademie der Wissenschaften, Phil.-hist. Klasse, vol. 3, p. 29.

13. Hans Nissen, Peter Damerow, and Robert K. Englund, Archaic Bookkeeping, p. 28.

14. D. Silvestri, L. Tonelli, and V. Valeri, The Earliest Script of Uruk (Syntactic Analysis), p. 225.

15. M. W. Green and Hans J. Nissen, Zeichenliste der Archaischen Texte aus Uruk, p. 175: 31.

16. Ibid., p. 210: 201.

17. Jeremy Black and Anthony Green, Gods, Demons, and Symbols of Ancient Mesopotamia; Anthony Green, “Beneficent Spirits and Malevolent Demons: The Iconography of Good and Evil in Ancient Assyria and Babylonia”; “A Note on the ‘Scorpion-Man’ and Pazuzu”; “The Lion-Demon in the Art of Mesopotamia and Neighbouring Regions”; “Ancient Mesopotamian Religious Iconography.”

18. Richard S. Ellis, “‘Lion-Men’ in Assyria.”

19. I. L. Finkel and M. J. Geller, eds., Sumerian Gods and Their Representations.

20. William W. Hallo, Origins, The Ancient Near Eastern Background of Some Modern Western Institutions.

21. W G. Lambert, “Gilgamesh in Literature and Art: The Second and First Millennia.”

-107-

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When Writing Met Art: From Symbol to Story
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction- Writing and Art 1
  • I - How Writing Shaped Art 13
  • One - Pottery Painting 15
  • Two - Glyptic 27
  • Three - The Uruk Vase- Sequential Narrative 41
  • Four - Wall and Floor Painting 47
  • II - How Art Shaped Writing 61
  • Five - Funerary Inscriptions 63
  • Six - Votive and Dedicatory Inscriptions 71
  • Seven - The Stele of Hammurabi 87
  • Conclusion- The Interface between Writing and Art 101
  • Notes 107
  • Bibliography 117
  • Index 129
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