When Writing Met Art: From Symbol to Story

By Denise Schmandt-Besserat | Go to book overview
Save to active project

INDEX
Page numbers in italics refer to illustrations.
abstraction, 105
Abu Salabikh archive, 86
accounting: impressed texts used for, 5, 6, 7, 9–11; tokens used for, 3–4, 11; in Uruk, 10–11
Adab, 70, 75
Ain Ghazal, Jordan: votive statues from, 76; wall and floor paintings from, 48, 48, 49
Ain Mallaha, Palestine, 47
Akalamdug, King of Ur, 68, 69
Akkadian dynasty, 76
Alalah, 76
Ali Kosh, Iran, 48
Anatolia, 47, 48, 49
animal motifs: animal contests, 66, 67, 68–69, 103; cattle, 15, 16; dogs, 16, 17, 18, 21; in funerary inscriptions, 66, 67, 69–70; lions, 66, 67; in pottery painting after writing, 22, 23, 24; on pottery painting before writing, 15–22, 16, 17, 19; scorpions, 19–20, 19, 21; on Tepe Gawra seals before writing, 30–33, 31–33; on Tepe Gawra seals during proto-literate period, 34– 35, 34; on Uruk vase, 43–44, 43; in wall and floor paintings, 48, 49, 50–53, 51, 52
anthropoid figures on Tepe Gawra seals, 30–33, 33
Anu Ziggurat, 28, 41
Arpachiyah, 15–16, 18
art: and abstraction, 105; characteristics of visual narrative structure, 102, 103; conclusion on influence of, on writing, 103–105; conclusion on writing as influence on, 101–103; definitions of, 2–3; and funerary inscriptions, 63–70; glyptic, 27–40; imagemaking as didactic tool, 105; imperfection in, 96; and impressed texts, 4–12; interface between writing and, 1–12, 59–60, 85–86, 99–105; legendary heroes and monsters in, 12; parallel lines and ground line in, during literate period, 1–2; pottery painting, 15–25, 102; stele of Hammurabi, 87–100; symmetry in, 8; Uruk vase, 41–46, 102; votive and dedicatory inscriptions, 71–86; wall and floor painting, 47–60
Ashusikildingir, 68, 69
Assur, 75, 76
Avery, Benjamin Parke, 41
Azarpay, Guitty, 12
Babylonian deities, 64
Baghouz, 18
Bahrani, Zainab, 12
banquet scene, 66, 67, 68–69, 70, 103
Barrelet, Marie-Thérèse, 12
Before Writing (Schmandt-Besserat), 10
birds: in pottery painting, 16, 17, 18, 21–22; in wall and floor paintings, 48, 49, 53
Black, Jeremy, 12
Boehmer, Rainer Michael, 28
Bottéro, Jean, 64
Bouqras, Syria, 49
Braun-Holzinger, Eva, 74, 77, 81
bullae, 29
Can Hasan, Anatolia, 47, 48, 49
Çatal Hüyük, Turkey: geometric designs in, 50; wall and floor paintings in, 50–53, 51, 52
cattle, 15, 16
Chalcolithic period, 47
chariot scenes, 22–25, 22, 23, 28, 103
Chatman, Seymour, 27
Chogha Mami, 18, 20
Chogha Mish, 29, 32
circular compositions, 31, 32, 33
cult of the dead, 2, 64–65, 70, 82–85
cuneiform writing. See writing
cylinder seals, 28, 69

-129-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
When Writing Met Art: From Symbol to Story
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 134

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?