Rebuilding Brand America: What We Must Do to Restore Our Reputation and Safeguard the Future of American Business Abroad

By Dick Martin | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 1
TILTING AT WINDMILLS

“If the United States doesn’t act forcefully and intelligently to define itself in the post-9/11 world, our enemies and detractors across the
globe will gladly do it for us. U.S. corporations have a responsibility
to leverage their enormous reach and influence to improve the
overall reputation of our country.”
1

—Keith Reinhard, president,
Business for Diplomatic Action, and chairman emeritus,
DDB Worldwide Communications

DESPITE HIS FASHIONABLY CLOSE-CROPPED HAIRCUT, DESIGNER eyeglass frames, and black-on-black tailored clothing, Keith Reinhard’s pulse beats to the easy rhythms of the Midwestern states where he was brought up and lived until the mid-1980s. Those homely sensibilities have made him a wealthy man.

Reinhard is an ad man, a legendary creative director and chairman emeritus of one of the world’s leading agency networks, but he learned his craft on Madison Avenue side streets that pass through the small farm communities of Indiana and Illinois. That’s where he began his career, albeit on the edges of advertising. His story is uniquely American.

For Reinhard, the attacks of September 11, 2001, were personal. Much of the destruction occurred less than five miles from his office on Madison Avenue behind Saint Patrick’s cathedral. When he went into the street he could smell the smoke and feel the ash from the collapsed World Trade Center buildings. He could hear the sirens of emergency vehicles screaming south, and he saw the stream of black

-15-

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Rebuilding Brand America: What We Must Do to Restore Our Reputation and Safeguard the Future of American Business Abroad
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction- The Anti-American Century 1
  • Part One 13
  • Chapter 1- Ilting at Windmills 15
  • Chapter 2- The Queen of Branding 24
  • Chapter 3- Charlotte in Wonderland 34
  • Chapter 4- The Prince of Pollsters 43
  • Chapter 5- Measuring Distance 51
  • Part Two 61
  • Chapter 6- Why Do They Hate Us? 63
  • Chapter 7- The Pictures in Their Heads 72
  • Chapter 8- The Business of America 84
  • Chapter 9- The Power of Brands 95
  • Chapter 10- Brand America 105
  • Chapter 11- Ceos' in Handcuffs 115
  • Chapter 12- Plague or Paranoia? 125
  • Part Three 139
  • Chapter 13- in Search of Anti-Anti-Americans 141
  • Chapter 14- The Path to Happy 150
  • Chapter 15- Sink Roots, Don't Just Spread Branches 162
  • Chapter 16- Go Glocal 175
  • Chapter 17- Share Your Customers' Cares 187
  • Chapter 18- Stiff-Necked, Tree-Hugging Critics 201
  • Chapter 19- Share Your Customers' Dreams 213
  • Chapter 20- Myth America 223
  • Chapter 21- A Lever to Move the World 233
  • Chapter 22- Waging Peace 246
  • Coda the Last Three Feet 257
  • A Note about the Endnotes 262
  • Notes 263
  • Acknowledgments 289
  • Index 291
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