Rebuilding Brand America: What We Must Do to Restore Our Reputation and Safeguard the Future of American Business Abroad

By Dick Martin | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 4
THE PRINCE OF POLLSTERS

“I want to be the Gallup of my generation, the household word, the generic.”1

—John Zogby, CEO and president, Zogby International

“Many of these survey’s—by Pew, John Zogby, and others—that tell
us what is being said about America in foreign lands, in my opinion,
are reallyjust a way for a segment of the American elite to talk about
America and put it in the words of foreigners.”
2

—Fouad Ajami, director of the Middle East Studies Program,
Johns Hopkins University

THE WAY JOHN ZOGBY TELLS IT, HE RAN INTO AN OLD HIGH school friend he hadn’t seen for years during the Friday evening happy hour at a bar in his hometown of Utica, New York. “I told him I was a pollster, spread the word,” Zogby says. “Lo and behold, first thing Monday I got a call from his aunt, and she said, ‘You’re a pollster?’ and I said yes, and she said, ‘Well, I have a sofa and a chair.’”3

His friend’s aunt clearly didn’t wear out her upholstery watching much television news or she would have recognized Zogby as the man Bill O’Reilly of Fox News and Chris Matthews of Hardball on MSNBC both introduced as “the nation’s most accurate pollster.” In the weeks and months since the September 11 attacks, Zogby was a frequent guest on the Today show, Good Morning America, and all the network news programs. As an Arab American himself, no one seemed to be better positioned to answer the question on every pundit’s lips: Why do they hate us? Indeed, in the last few years, with the help of a vora

-43-

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Rebuilding Brand America: What We Must Do to Restore Our Reputation and Safeguard the Future of American Business Abroad
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction- The Anti-American Century 1
  • Part One 13
  • Chapter 1- Ilting at Windmills 15
  • Chapter 2- The Queen of Branding 24
  • Chapter 3- Charlotte in Wonderland 34
  • Chapter 4- The Prince of Pollsters 43
  • Chapter 5- Measuring Distance 51
  • Part Two 61
  • Chapter 6- Why Do They Hate Us? 63
  • Chapter 7- The Pictures in Their Heads 72
  • Chapter 8- The Business of America 84
  • Chapter 9- The Power of Brands 95
  • Chapter 10- Brand America 105
  • Chapter 11- Ceos' in Handcuffs 115
  • Chapter 12- Plague or Paranoia? 125
  • Part Three 139
  • Chapter 13- in Search of Anti-Anti-Americans 141
  • Chapter 14- The Path to Happy 150
  • Chapter 15- Sink Roots, Don't Just Spread Branches 162
  • Chapter 16- Go Glocal 175
  • Chapter 17- Share Your Customers' Cares 187
  • Chapter 18- Stiff-Necked, Tree-Hugging Critics 201
  • Chapter 19- Share Your Customers' Dreams 213
  • Chapter 20- Myth America 223
  • Chapter 21- A Lever to Move the World 233
  • Chapter 22- Waging Peace 246
  • Coda the Last Three Feet 257
  • A Note about the Endnotes 262
  • Notes 263
  • Acknowledgments 289
  • Index 291
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