Rebuilding Brand America: What We Must Do to Restore Our Reputation and Safeguard the Future of American Business Abroad

By Dick Martin | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 7
THE PICTURES IN
THEIR HEADS

“The United States lost the public relations war in the Muslim world
a long time ago. They could have the prophet Muhammad doing
public relations and it wouldn’t help.”
1

—Osama Siblani, publisher, The Arab American News

DARK, SLENDER, AND HANDSOME, AS WELL AS A CERTIFIED foreign policy wonk, Fareed Zakaria has been called everything from an “intellectual heartthrob”2 to a “junior Kissinger.”3 When he isn’t on the road, he oversees the international editions of Newsweek magazine from a spacious corner office in a midtown Manhattan skyscraper. Although he carries the title of “editor,” he seldom actually edits anything in the sense of marking up copy. His job is to come up with story ideas for Newsweek’s ten international editions, in addition to writing a biweekly column that is also syndicated by The Washington Post. That’s his day job. He is also a very popular public speaker; writes books; hosts a half-hour weekly program on PBS, Foreign Exchange; and is a regular guest on both ABC’s This Week with George Stephanopoulos and Comedy Central’s Daily Show with Jon Stewart. He even used to write a wine column for the online magazine Slate. Straddling such dissimilar worlds seems to have been his destiny.


FAREED ZAKARIA

Zakaria was born and raised in Bombay (now Mumbai), India, to a father who was a popular political figure and a mother who was an

-72-

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Rebuilding Brand America: What We Must Do to Restore Our Reputation and Safeguard the Future of American Business Abroad
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction- The Anti-American Century 1
  • Part One 13
  • Chapter 1- Ilting at Windmills 15
  • Chapter 2- The Queen of Branding 24
  • Chapter 3- Charlotte in Wonderland 34
  • Chapter 4- The Prince of Pollsters 43
  • Chapter 5- Measuring Distance 51
  • Part Two 61
  • Chapter 6- Why Do They Hate Us? 63
  • Chapter 7- The Pictures in Their Heads 72
  • Chapter 8- The Business of America 84
  • Chapter 9- The Power of Brands 95
  • Chapter 10- Brand America 105
  • Chapter 11- Ceos' in Handcuffs 115
  • Chapter 12- Plague or Paranoia? 125
  • Part Three 139
  • Chapter 13- in Search of Anti-Anti-Americans 141
  • Chapter 14- The Path to Happy 150
  • Chapter 15- Sink Roots, Don't Just Spread Branches 162
  • Chapter 16- Go Glocal 175
  • Chapter 17- Share Your Customers' Cares 187
  • Chapter 18- Stiff-Necked, Tree-Hugging Critics 201
  • Chapter 19- Share Your Customers' Dreams 213
  • Chapter 20- Myth America 223
  • Chapter 21- A Lever to Move the World 233
  • Chapter 22- Waging Peace 246
  • Coda the Last Three Feet 257
  • A Note about the Endnotes 262
  • Notes 263
  • Acknowledgments 289
  • Index 291
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