Rebuilding Brand America: What We Must Do to Restore Our Reputation and Safeguard the Future of American Business Abroad

By Dick Martin | Go to book overview
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NOTES

Introduction

1. Ivan Krastev, “The Anti-American Century?” Journal of Democracy (April 2004). See www.journalofdemocracy.org/articles/toc/tocapr04.html (last accessed on July 14, 2006).

2. Global Market Insite’s 2004 survey of people in twenty countries found that 35 percent say “U.S. foreign policy is the most important factor in formulating their image of America.”

3. Nicolas Albanese et al., Streetwise Italian Dictionary/Thesaurus (New York: McGraw Hill, 2005).

4. Julianne Malveaux, “The African American Bridge,” USA Today (January 3, 2003).

5. Kishore Mahbubani, Beyond the Age of Innocence: Rebuilding Trust Between America and the World (New York: Perseus, 2005), p. 39.

6. Department of Defense, “Active Duty Military Personnel Strengths by Regional Area and by Country” (309A), June 30, 2005.

7. According to the Federation of American Scientists; see www.fas.org/main/ home.jsp.

8. Bernard Chazelle, “Anti-Americanism: A Clinical Study,” Princeton University, 2004. See www.cs.princeton.edu/~chazelle/politics/antiam.html (last accessed on July 13, 2006).

9. Francis Fukuyama, America at the Crossroads (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2006), p. 103.

10. Tony Judt, Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945 (New York: Penguin Press, 2005), p. 353.

11. Political scientist Samuel Huntington coined the phrase “clash of civilizations” in a seminal Foreign Affairs magazine article, notable not only for its insight but its predictive accuracy. Written in the summer of 1993, following the collapse of the Soviet Union, Huntington forecast that the cultural gulf between Western Christianity and Islam would be the fault line of conflict in the future. See Samuel Huntington, “The Clash of Civilizations?” Foreign Affairs (Summer 1993).

12. Lee Harris, “The Intellectual Origins of America Bashing,” Policy Review No. 116 (December 2002/January 2003).

13. Joseph S. Nye, Jr. “Bush Can Reverse America’s Declining Popularity,” Newsday (December 22, 2004).

14. “A Major Change of Public Opinion in the Muslim World,” a poll commissioned by Terror Free Tomorrow and conducted by the Indonesian Survey Institute February 1–6, 2005. The poll included 1,200 respondents nationwide and had a margin of error of 2.9 percent. See www.terrorfreetomorrow.org/ articlenav.php?id = 56 (last accessed on March 15, 2006).

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