Rebuilding Brand America: What We Must Do to Restore Our Reputation and Safeguard the Future of American Business Abroad

By Dick Martin | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

ACCORDING TO MY WIFE, GINNY, I SHOULD ACKNOWLEDGE THE contribution of the La-Z-Boy company, which manufactured the chair in which I wrote most of this book. In addition to warning me that I should sit on both sides of the chair, my wife also read various versions of the manuscript, pushing for clarity and conciseness. Any failings on that score were entirely mine, as the condition of my now listing recliner attests.

Other friends were also generous with their time as this manuscript took shape, and it profited from their comments. Marilyn Laurie, who was my boss at AT&T for nearly two decades, easily resumed her natural role of cheerleader, guide, and sounding board. Vic Pelson, another former AT&T senior executive, gave me the benefit of his broad and deep experience navigating global markets. Bill Clossey, who led AT&T’s international public affairs for several years, helped sharpen the book’s argument and kept me from getting lost in the statistics. Michael Goodman, the director of the Corporate Communications Institute at Fairleigh Dickinson University, shared his own extensive research on anti-Americanism and was one of the first to urge me to tackle the subject. David Goodman, a young expat living in Paris, kept me in touch with the local media in what many people consider ground zero for anti-Americanism. Steve Kowitt made a number of thoughtful suggestions that improved the book’s structure. Marcel Martin allowed me to tap his years of experience as a United Nations official and provided many helpful suggestions. And Bill Culley not only shared his experiences with the United States Information Agency and the Voice of America, but took my photo for the book jacket.

Among the many business people I interviewed in the course of my research, I particularly want to single out the following for generously

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Rebuilding Brand America: What We Must Do to Restore Our Reputation and Safeguard the Future of American Business Abroad
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction- The Anti-American Century 1
  • Part One 13
  • Chapter 1- Ilting at Windmills 15
  • Chapter 2- The Queen of Branding 24
  • Chapter 3- Charlotte in Wonderland 34
  • Chapter 4- The Prince of Pollsters 43
  • Chapter 5- Measuring Distance 51
  • Part Two 61
  • Chapter 6- Why Do They Hate Us? 63
  • Chapter 7- The Pictures in Their Heads 72
  • Chapter 8- The Business of America 84
  • Chapter 9- The Power of Brands 95
  • Chapter 10- Brand America 105
  • Chapter 11- Ceos' in Handcuffs 115
  • Chapter 12- Plague or Paranoia? 125
  • Part Three 139
  • Chapter 13- in Search of Anti-Anti-Americans 141
  • Chapter 14- The Path to Happy 150
  • Chapter 15- Sink Roots, Don't Just Spread Branches 162
  • Chapter 16- Go Glocal 175
  • Chapter 17- Share Your Customers' Cares 187
  • Chapter 18- Stiff-Necked, Tree-Hugging Critics 201
  • Chapter 19- Share Your Customers' Dreams 213
  • Chapter 20- Myth America 223
  • Chapter 21- A Lever to Move the World 233
  • Chapter 22- Waging Peace 246
  • Coda the Last Three Feet 257
  • A Note about the Endnotes 262
  • Notes 263
  • Acknowledgments 289
  • Index 291
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