Cato Supreme Court Review 2005-2006

By Roger Pilon; Robert A. Levy et al. | Go to book overview

Contributors

Douglas A. Berman is an associate professor of law at the Ohio State University Moritz College of Law. He received his A.B. from Princeton University and his J.D. from Harvard Law School, where he was the editor and Developments Office Chair of the Harvard Law Review. After graduation, Professor Berman served as a law clerk for the Honorable Jon O. Newman and then for the Honorable Guido Calabresi, both on the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. Professor Berman is the co-author of a casebook, Sentencing Law and Policy: Cases, Statutes and Guidelines, published by Aspen Publishers; has served as an editor of the Federal Sentencing Reporter for nearly ten years; and also now serves as co-managing editor of the Ohio State Journal of Criminal Law. Professor Berman is the sole creator and author of the widely-read and widely-cited web log, Sentencing Law and Policy, which has the distinction of being the first blog cited by the U.S. Supreme Court and has been cited in at least four federal circuit opinions, nearly a dozen federal district court opinions, and in dozens of law reviews.

Dale Carpenter is the Julius E. Davis Professor of Law at the University of Minnesota Law School, where he teaches and writes in the areas of constitutional law, the First Amendment, sexual orientation and the law, and commercial law. He also serves as an editor of Constitutional Commentary. Professor Carpenter received his B.A. degree in history, magna cum laude, from Yale College in 1989. He received his J.D., with honors, from the University of Chicago Law School in 1992. At the University of Chicago he was editor-in-chief of the University of Chicago Law Review; the recipient of the D. Francis Bustin Prize for excellence in legal scholarship; and the recipient of a John M. Olin Foundation Scholarship for Law and Economics. Professor Carpenter clerked for the Honorable Edith H. Jones of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit from 1992 to 1993. After his clerkship, he practiced as an associate at Vinson &

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