No Minor Accomplishment: The Revival of New Jersey Professional Baseball

By Bob Golon | Go to book overview

Notes

One: Baseball’s Early Roots in New Jersey

1. The definitive history of the game of baseball in New Jersey pre-1950 continues to be The Jersey Game by James M. DiClerico and Barry J. Pavelec (New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 1991). This informative book was written just as the modern era of minor-league baseball in New Jersey was about to take off. It serves as a complete historical guide to the early game in the state.

2. Unfortunately, “Cap” Anson is known as much for his blatant racism as he is for being a baseball pioneer. This topic is covered particularly well in Baseball: An Illustrated History by Ken Burns and Geoffrey C. Ward (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1994). This is the same work that resulted in the film documentary series Baseball, also by Ken Burns. Burns’s book pays particular attention to the plight of blacks in baseball in the early twentieth century and is a very good source on black baseball in the United States.

3. Those interested in the history of baseball stadium construction should consult Diamonds: The Evolution of the Ballpark, from Elysian Fields to Camden Yards, by Michael Gershman (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1993). Gershman fully chronicles the development of the concrete-and-steel parks that dominated in the early twentieth century. Another great source for “all things ballpark” is Green Cathedrals by Philip J. Lowry (Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley, 1992).

4. Considerable information on the Newark Peppers and the construction of Harrison Field in 1915 can be found by viewing the microfilm of the Newark Evening News at the New Jersey Room of the Newark Public Library. My article, “Newark’s Harrison Field,” published in The National Pastime (Cleveland: Society for American Baseball Research, 1996), is a summary of the genesis of the Peppers and their home stadium in Harrison. For general information on the Federal League, Mark Okkonen’s The Federal League of 1914–1915: Baseball’s Third Major League (Cleveland: Society for American Baseball Research, 1989) remains a definitive work.

5. The rationale used and decisions made by the New York major-league clubs in the 1930s and 1940s concerning night baseball were researched by electronically searching the New York Times via the Proquest Historical Newspapers Database, available at many public and university libraries.

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