The Edinburgh History of the Book in Scotland - Vol. 4

By David Finkelstein; Alistair McCleery | Go to book overview

Section 5
AUTHORS AND READERS
Overview

THE NINETEENTH CENTURY, covered in the previous volume in this series, witnessed the gradual assertion of authors’ rights and the acquisition of social status for professional writers. Two factors can be identified as contributing to these changes: the increasing demand for words to fill the pages of newspapers and magazines and the shelves of the circulating and other libraries; and the emergence of the author as celebrity from Scott onwards. The Scottish publishing industry cannily invested in new authors as it carried on its lucrative trade in reprints; and it balanced its fiction lists with steadily selling text books in science, law and theology, as detailed in Section 4 above. Edinburgh itself con­ tained the printers and booksellers necessary to sustain this publishing output but it competed with London for the authors who provided its raw material, even those nurtured in Scotland and in its reviews. Scott provided a role model for those wishing to remain in Scotland although his initial volumes of poetry, Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border (1802–3) and The Lay of the Last Minstrel (1805), were largely handled by London-based booksellers. This changed with Marmion (1808) under­ taken by Constable and The Lady of the Lake (1810) by John Ballantyne, in which Scott was himself a secret partner. The Scott Monument in Princes Street in Edinburgh represents, all the way up to its 200-foot top, an iconic statement of Scott’s celebrity status.

That status was tied up with the author’s ability to command greater earnings. Three methods of rewarding the author were in common use throughout the nineteenth century as subscription fell into general disuse. Writers could share the risk of publication with the publisher in return for half the profits after costs but often encountered disreputable partners who inflated costs to diminish profits. Secondly, writers could sell copyright in their work outright to the publisher, receiving only the

-385-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Edinburgh History of the Book in Scotland - Vol. 4
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Advisory Board ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures ix
  • Tables xii
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • Acknowledgements xiv
  • Chronology xvii
  • Introduction 1
  • Section 1 - He Publishing Infrastructure- 1880–1980 13
  • Section 2 - Production, Form and Image 92
  • Section 3 - Publishing Policies- The Literary Culture 182
  • Section 4 - Publishing Policies- The Diversity of Print Overview 295
  • Section 5 - Authors and Readers Overview 385
  • Section 6 - The Future of the Book in Scotland 455
  • Contributors 478
  • Bibliography 484
  • Index 503
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 524

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.