The Edinburgh History of the Book in Scotland - Vol. 4

By David Finkelstein; Alistair McCleery | Go to book overview

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Aarseth, E. (1997) Cybertext: Perspectives on Ergodic Literature. Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press.

——— (2000) Transcript of ELO/trAce chat What Are We Playing For Anyway? www.eliterature.org/com/archives/chat121700.shtml [accessed 17 Dec. 2001].

Adam & Charles Black, 1807–1957, Some Chapters in the History of a Publishing House (1957). London: Black.

Addison, Rosemary (2000a) ‘Spirited Activity: Scottish Book Design and Women Illustrators 1890–1920’ Journal of the Society for Art History (Dec.): 59–68.

——— (2000b) ‘Glasgow Girl – Katharine Cameron’, Scottish Book Collector 6(9): 4–7.

——— (2001) ‘Cecile Walton – Familiar Patterns’, Scottish Book Collector 7(5): 24–6.

——— (2005) ‘Designing Woman – Wendy Wood’, Scottish Book Collector 7(11): 4–9. Aitken Dott (1992) 150 Years of Aitken Dott, the Scottish Gallery. Edinburgh: The Scottish Gallery.

Aitken, W. R. (1971) A History of the Public Library Movement in Scotland to 1955. Glasgow: Scottish Library Association.

Alison, James and Ronald Renton (eds) (2003) Treasure Islands: A Guide to Scottish Fiction for Young Readers aged 10–14. Glasgow: Association for Scottish Literary Studies, Schools & Further Education Committee.

Allen, Ruth (2005) Winning Books: An Evaluation and History of Major Awards for Children’s Books in the English-Speaking World. Lichfield: Pied Piper.

Allen, Walter (1957) ‘Authorship’, in The Book World Today (ed. John Hampton). London: George Allen & Unwin.

Altick, Richard D. (1957) The English Common Reader: A Social History of the Mass Reading Public. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.

Anderson, M. and D. J. Morse (1990) ‘The People’, in People and Society in Scotland II: 1830–1914 (ed. W. Hamish Fraser and R. J. Morris). Edinburgh: John Donald Publishers Ltd, 8–46.

Anderson, P. S. and J. Rose (eds) (1991) British Literary Publishing Houses, 1820–1880. Detroit, MI: Gale Research.

Anderson, R. D. (1995) Education and the Scottish People, 1750–1918. Oxford: Clarendon Press.

Arata, Stephen D. (1996) ‘The Sedulous Ape: Atavism, Professionalism, and Stevenson’s Jekyll and Hyde’, in Fictions of Loss in the Victorian Fin de Siècle, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 233–59.

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The Edinburgh History of the Book in Scotland - Vol. 4
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Advisory Board ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures ix
  • Tables xii
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • Acknowledgements xiv
  • Chronology xvii
  • Introduction 1
  • Section 1 - He Publishing Infrastructure- 1880–1980 13
  • Section 2 - Production, Form and Image 92
  • Section 3 - Publishing Policies- The Literary Culture 182
  • Section 4 - Publishing Policies- The Diversity of Print Overview 295
  • Section 5 - Authors and Readers Overview 385
  • Section 6 - The Future of the Book in Scotland 455
  • Contributors 478
  • Bibliography 484
  • Index 503
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