Managing Your Government Career: Success Strategies That Work

By Stewart Liff | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 8
Balancing Your
Work Life and Your
Family Life

WHETHER OR NOT you go into management, finding the appropriate balance between work and the rest of your life is one of the most difficult things to do. This is especially true once you start moving up the ladder, since more and more demands are placed upon you. In my experience, far too many people become so consumed with their job that the rest of their life suffers, and they wind up paying a heavy price.

These people are so determined to get to the top, so hell-bent on achieving success, at least from a career perspective, that they fail to realize that there is more to life than simply their job. This is not to say that getting ahead at work is not important, because it surely is. However, from time to time, you need to step back and ask yourself how you define success. If you get the job you have always wanted, but you lose your marriage along the way, is that really worth it? If you work long hours and achieve the bonus you have been striving for, but you wind up overweight and with high blood pressure, what have you truly accomplished? The point here is that you need to define success on the job as part of a bigger picture—i.e., the success of your entire life—and make your decisions within that context. Otherwise, one day you may look back on your life and realize that you couldn’t see the forest through the trees.

-190-

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Managing Your Government Career: Success Strategies That Work
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Part I- Getting in (Arriving) 1
  • Chapter 1- Should I Work for the Government and If So, Where? 3
  • Chapter 2- How Do I Get in? 32
  • Part 2- Getting off to a Good Start (Surviving) 57
  • Chapter 3- in the Beginning 59
  • Chapter 4- Your Relationship with Your Superiors 82
  • Chapter 5- Developing Perspective 114
  • Part 3- Plotting Your Career (Thriving) 139
  • Chapter 6- Looking Down the Road 141
  • Chapter 7- Management 165
  • Chapter 8- Balancing Your Work Life and Your Family Life 190
  • Chapter 9- Personal Development 213
  • Notes 231
  • Index 247
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