Managing Your Government Career: Success Strategies That Work

By Stewart Liff | Go to book overview
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CHAPTER 9
Personal
Development

ONE OF THE CHARACTERISTICS that distinguish the most successful people is that they continue to learn throughout their lives. No matter how much money they have, no matter how much power they have, they are never satisfied, and they constantly try to improve. I think this is an excellent lesson for all of us.

When I was growing up, I was struck by how accomplished some people were at a young age, whereas others were less mature and progressed at a slower pace. As I got older, I noticed that in many cases, the people who started out less advanced moved past the people who were initially perceived as being the greater successes. Looking back on those dynamics, I recognized that one of the reasons for the shift in fortunes was that many of the people who started quickly relied almost exclusively on their innate talents and simply did not develop much further. In contrast, a lot of the people who started out slower worked hard at improving, and ultimately achieved greater success than their more talented comrades. Once again, the tortoise defeated the hare.


Engage in Growth Activities

To me, the difference between the two groups seems to be largely a function of personal drive. The people who wanted to get better did whatever

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