Please update your browser

You're using a version of Internet Explorer that isn't supported by Questia.
To get a better experience, go to one of these sites and get the latest
version of your preferred browser:

The Civil War Memoirs of a Virginia Cavalryman

By Robert T. Hubard Jr.; Thomas P. Nanzig | Go to book overview

9
“To Gain Kilpatrick's Rear at Buckland”

While we were at Fredericksburg the Army of Northern Virginia lay quietly in camp along the south bank of the Rapidan, General Meade's forces being mostly beyond Culpeper Court House. Our life now was quite monotonous for a month. One division of Yankee cavalry were in camp about two miles from Falmouth and picketted the river opposite us. The pickets were civil enough not to shoot at each other.

About the middle of August we went into camp at Harrison's house, (brother of the historian of Virginia), our headquarters being in his yard. He was extremely civil to us and seemed pleased to have us near him.

In the latter part of the month Colonel Owen was sent with a detachment of 200 men from the 1st and 3rd Virginia and 1st Maryland Cavalry to cross the Rappahannock at Port Royal, come up on the other side, and cross the ford, (at low tide), just above Fredericksburg after dark. The object of this expedition was to intimidate the marauding parties from [H. Judson] Kilpatrick's Division who were daily going down the river depredating upon the people.1 I went along as adjutant of the command.

We went into camp 1st night near Port Royal and next day succeeded after great difficulty in getting from the infantry division stationed there, possession of an old pungy and a barge [at] about 12 noon.2 One of these wouldn't carry horses. The other one took about 8 at a time. It was soon found, however, that we couldn't cross in time unless the horses were carried faster. So the men who went in the pungy held their horses by the bridle, they swimming the while. It was soon found that many would be drowned in this way so they were turned loose and swam safely over.

-107-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Civil War Memoirs of a Virginia Cavalryman
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 302

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.