The Civil War Memoirs of a Virginia Cavalryman

By Robert T. Hubard Jr.; Thomas P. Nanzig | Go to book overview

Afterword

Sent to receive medical care at Farmville, then onward to his father's Buckingham County plantation north of that town, Robert Hubard enjoyed the rare luxury of recovering in his own house in a region of Virginia that had been spared the hard hand of war. According to Hubard's concluding paragraph, his war memoirs were completed on 3 December 1866, a year and one-half after the conclusion of the war. It is easy to imagine that during this healing period Hubard spent hours reviewing the war letters he had sent to his family from the campaigns in Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania. Using a ledger as a journal, he transcribed in an easily read hand the account of his departure from the University of Virginia in 1861, the course of the war as he experienced it, and his homecoming in 1865.

With the war over in Virginia and his slaves emancipated, Robert Hubard, Sr., with the help of his recovering son, struggled to keep the family plantations profitable. Contracts were signed with the freedmen who remained at Chellowe. Wages were paid to some, and shares of crops were paid to others. During these adjustments, Robert, Jr., became a licensed attorney and started a law practice in December 1865.1

As Virginia tobacco conditions and prices slowly declined in the postwar years, the Hubards found it more and more difficult to remain solvent. Competition from North Carolina, South Carolina, Kentucky, Ohio, and Missouri tobacco crops cut into the Virginia market to the extent that by the time of Robert Hubard, Sr.'s, death in 1871, Robert, Jr., was the only one of the Hubard siblings who was not in debt. According to one study of the Hubard postwar fortunes, “As early as 1872, [brother]

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The Civil War Memoirs of a Virginia Cavalryman
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xxi
  • Editor's Note xxv
  • Introduction 1
  • Year 1 - 1861 5
  • 1 - [Three Cheers for the Southern Flag!] 7
  • Year 2 - 1862 25
  • 2 - [the Rapid Decline of Martial Spirit] 27
  • 3 - [Our Little Peninsula World] 32
  • 4 - [the Enemy Were Worsted] 44
  • 5 - [a Little Stream of Limestone Water] 57
  • 6 - [Stuart Set out on a Raid] 66
  • Year 3 - 1863 77
  • 7 - [One of the Best Cavalry Fights of the War] 79
  • 8 - [Our Brigade Advanced to Aldie] 88
  • 9 - [to Gain Kilpatrick's Rear at Buckland] 107
  • Year 4 - 1864 129
  • 10 - [Boys, You Have Made the Most Glorious Fight] 131
  • 11 - [a Furious Charge Was Made upon Our Line] 162
  • 12 - [We're off for the Valley] 184
  • 13 - [Tattered Flags Sporting in the Breeze] 193
  • Year 5 1865 211
  • 14 - [a Spectacle of Monstrous Absurdity!] 213
  • Afterword 228
  • Appendix A - Eyewitness Accounts of Bagley Shooting Incident 231
  • Appendix B - Carter Account of Chambersburg Raid 233
  • Notes 235
  • Bibliography 285
  • Index 293
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