The Civil War Memoirs of a Virginia Cavalryman

By Robert T. Hubard Jr.; Thomas P. Nanzig | Go to book overview

Appendix B
Carter Account of Chambersburg Raid

Oct. 14th The portion of the regiment detailed to go with Gen. Stuart into Md. & Penn. returned this morning with horses very much jaded & broken down from hard service. This expedition taken from the different brigades was composed of 1800 cavalry & two guns. They rendezvoused at Darksville, Berkeley Co., on the 9th Oct. & marched one mile beyond Hedgesville where they encamped for the night.

Early next morning they took up their line of march about sunrise & crossed the Potomac at a very rocky ford, capturing some ten or fifteen prisoners on the other side of the river, which prisoners were sent back under guard. Here they learned that a division of the enemy, 10,000 strong, had just marched along the same road. But Gen. Stuart proceeded towards Chambersburg, Penn., giving orders to have details sent out as soon as they passed the line, to capture all horses that were serviceable for artillery or cavalry.

He reached Chambersburg & found the Home Guards prepared to make resistance, but sending them word that if they did not submit unconditionally & at once, he would shell the town; the commanding officer in the place very soon surrendered & the Gen. spent the night in the town with most of the command outside. This was a very rainy & disagreeable night, but such was the fear of the inhabitants that they readily furnished the soldiers, or “rebels,” as they called them, everything they needed or wished to eat.

On the morning of Oct. 11th they set out early with the horses & other things they had taken—after destroying a large lot of sabres & such pistols as they could not bring away—towards Emmetsburg. Here our men

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