The Life and Adventures of Morrison of China

By Peter Thompson; Robert Macklin | Go to book overview

14
RESCUE AND RETRIBUTION

Sir Claude MacDonald had insisted at the beginning of his command that the Fu must be held ‘at all hazards’. Apart from the shelter it provided for Chinese Christians, the artificial hills in the palace grounds overlooked the east wall of the British Legation and covered the rear of the Spanish, Japanese and French Legations. If the Fu were to fall, those garrisons would surely follow.

Morrison had made many sorties across no man’s land to visit the Fu since 20 June, often accompanying Captain Strouts on his tours of inspection. For safer access, a stone barricade had been erected slightly south of the British Legation’s main entrance and a deep cutting gouged into either bank of the canal. On the eastern side a second stone barricade led to the entrance of the Fu. Once inside, there was a scene of desolation, deprivation and danger. Many of

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The Life and Adventures of Morrison of China
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vi
  • Prologue - Peking 1900 viii
  • Part I - 1862–1894 1
  • 1- Shoe Leather 3
  • 2- The Noblest Profession 19
  • 3- Exposing the Slavers 29
  • 4- Following Burke and Wills 44
  • 5- New Guinea Disaster 57
  • 6- Doctor's Orders 76
  • 7- Eastern Promise 88
  • 8- A Pleasant Journey 99
  • Part II - 1895–1911 123
  • 9- Moberly's Man 125
  • 10- Secret Agent 136
  • 11- Chinese Puzzle 154
  • 12- Dragon Empress 179
  • 13- The Boxer Uprising 1900 201
  • 14- Rescue and Retribution 234
  • 15- Morrison's War 255
  • 16- The Northcliffe Touch 275
  • 17- Revolution! 302
  • Part III - 1912–1920 323
  • 18- China's Champion 325
  • 19- The Entwined Heart 342
  • 20- Perfidious Nippon 364
  • 21- Dynasty of Dunces 383
  • 22- Sentimental Journey 406
  • 23- The Final Struggle 419
  • Epilogue - The Noble Professional 435
  • Notes 439
  • Sources and Bibliography 449
  • Index 454
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