Measuring Empowerment: Cross-Disciplinary Perspectives

By Deepa Narayan | Go to book overview

Preface

This book is dedicated to those who work on making human rights a reality for all. The human rights framework is universal, but its form must be local. The cover photo illustrates the complexities in taking universal principles and translating and applying them correctly in different cultural, political, and economic contexts.

The woman in the burqa appeared on the front page of the Times of India, a leading Indian newspaper, on October 14, 2004, following elections in the state of Maharashtra. Circulating the photograph to friends and colleagues as the choice for the cover of this book drew mixed reactions. A woman in burqa to some was not a message of women’s empowerment, but one of oppression. Others said that the picture represented the woman’s strength and freedom. Many Islamic scholars and women in burqa themselves have stated that the burqa for them is a symbol of freedom. It means freedom of movement, and freedom from unwanted male attention or harassment in public spaces. The woman’s raised finger also served as a Rorschach test, being variously interpreted depending upon the viewer’s cultural frame of reference. In the Indian context, however, the symbolism is clear. The black indelible ink on the woman’s finger shows she has exercised her right to vote and thus to influence the election of leaders of her state. While we know little about her level of oppression or freedom in other aspects of her life, in the domain of electoral politics she is free, and choosing to make her voice heard.

The picture of the woman in the burqa thus reflects the complexities in measuring empowerment and in moving from universal concepts to contextspecific measures. However complex and difficult, this is a problem that must be tackled. Poverty reduction on a large scale depends on empowering the central actors, those who are most motivated to move out of poverty—poor people themselves. But if empowerment cannot be measured, it will not be taken seriously in development policy making and programming.

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Measuring Empowerment: Cross-Disciplinary Perspectives
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 475

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.