Karol Wojtyla: The Thought of the Man Who Became Pope John Paul II

By Rocco Buttiglione; Paolo Guietti et al. | Go to book overview

7. The Poetry of Karol Wojtyła

Wojtyła began his philosophical journey within the pages of literature. It was only later that he came to academic philosophy per se. But his love for literature, which he has carried with him throughout his life and which is a distinctive trait of his personality, has from the outset taken the form of a search for the truth of man. If one sees philosophy and literature as intermingled, that might legitimate a philosophical reading of the poetic works, such as we are equipped to offer. Moreover, as Krzystof Dybciak has noted in his essay about Karol Wojtyła, the cross-fertilization of literature and philosophy has always been a part of the great tradition of Polish culture.1 Mickiewicz, Słowacki, Krasinski, and Norwid have not only built beautiful castles of words; they have always tried to express universal truths and to direct us toward them through their poetic creations. Polish philosophers, moreover, typically engaged in the practice of literature or at least of literary or artistic criticism: they have done so from Znaniecki to Witkacy and from Kotarbinski to Kolakowski and Ingarden himself. Within the Polish tradition, the work of art is understood as giving form to the ethos of the nation; and it is by virtue of that ethos that universal value is concretized and made affectively available within it. But literature also represents a rediscovery of the values of the experience of life, following upon the failure of the totalizing systems which had presumed to demonstrate such values.

1. Cf. Krzystof Dybciak, La grande testimonianza (Bologna: CSEO, 1981). The essay
about Wojtyła is “Penso…ci× che sento col cuore. Sull’opera letteraria di Karol Wojtyła,”
pp. 167-86. See especially p. 167.

-232-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Karol Wojtyla: The Thought of the Man Who Became Pope John Paul II
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 384

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.