The Limits of Influence: Pico, Louvain, and the Crisis of Renaissance Astrology

By Steven Vanden Broecke | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

It is with great pleasure that I acknowledge the crucial role of many friends and colleagues in the completion of this book. This project would not have been started - nor finished - without the support of my doktorvater]an Roegiers. Charles Burnett and Jill Kraye graciously agreed to supervise my work during a crucial stay at the Warburg Institute. Time and again, members of the Louvain Seminarium Philologiae Humanisticae proved to be the heirs of a time when disciplinary boundaries were less constraining than they have since become. Jan Papy deserves special mention among them. Robert Westman made me aware that others traveled equally unfamiliar grounds. His critical comments on early drafts were particularly stimulating, as was the advice of Fernand Hallyn, John North, Geert Vanpaemel, and Christoffel Waelkens. Much later, Christoph Lüthy heroically read through the entire final draft.

Many others offered valuable assistance, advice, and encouragement: Daniel Anderson, Gera van Bedaf, Paul Bockstaele, Wouter Bracke, Guido Cloet, Nicholas Clulee, Elly Cockx-Indestege, Chris Coppens, Andreas De Block, Gerard l’Estrange Turner, James Evans, Steve Farmer, Guido Giglioni, Anthony Grafton, Guido Gubbels, Wouter Hanegraaff, Darin Hayton, Stephen Johnston, David Juste, Robert Kargon, Robert Karrow, Allison Kavey, Daryn Lehoux, Jean Meeus, Ad Meskens, Adam Mosley, Jan Opsomer, Sophie Page, Lawrence Principe, Hilde de Ridder-Symoens, H. Darrel Rutkin, Jole Shackelford, Carlos Steel, Jacques Vandamme, Koenraad Van Cleempoel, Toon Van Houdt, and Shirley Yoo.

The Fund for Scientific Research of Flanders (FWOV) was particularly generous in funding the research on which most of this study is based. Further changes and revisions were made possible by a Frances Yates fellowship from the Warburg Institute, a travel grant from the Wellcome Institute, and a postdoctoral fellowship from the Johns Hopkins University.

Excerpts from my paper “Dee, Mercator, and Louvain Instrument Making: an Undescribed Astrological Disc by Gerard Mercator (1551),” published in Annals of Science, 58 (2001), pp. 219–40, were

-xiii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Limits of Influence: Pico, Louvain, and the Crisis of Renaissance Astrology
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 320

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.