The Limits of Influence: Pico, Louvain, and the Crisis of Renaissance Astrology

By Steven Vanden Broecke | Go to book overview

CONCLUSION

In the summer of 1467, the Hungarian King Mathias 1 Corvinus hosted a public contest to find the time of conception of the newborn son of Countjohann von Rosgou by astrological means.1 Around the same time, the King sponsored the completion of Regiomontanus’s astrological tables, by which “the times of all future events are chiefly investigated.”2

Regiomontanus’s successors increasingly preferred to distance themselves from astrological practice. In 1600, Tycho Brahe sent the following reply to a request for astrological counseling:

I do not freely devote much time to such issues, being more addicted
to serious and momentous studies.3

Twenty years later, his former assistant Joannes Kepler introduced a prognostication for 1620 as follows:

If I only put forward what the heavens provide, men the calculation of
an annual ephemeris would absolve the matter, and I would retain my
fame in this annual exercise without being contradicted by anyone.4

What caused this apparent defection among elite astrological practitioners? The question has been addressed in this book through a detailed study of the Louvain astrological community, which was located at the border of the Holy Roman Empire.


1. Antecedents

The University of Louvain was erected in 1425, at the end of the first wave of German university foundations. Its medical faculty soon became home to a flourishing community of astrological practitioners.

1 Zinner, Regiomontanus, trans. Brown, p. 94.

2 Regiomontanus, Tabulae directionum (1552), vol. 1, fols. b1v-b2r: “(…) ubi tem-
pora futurorum accidentium omnium per directiones potissimum investigari soient.”

3 Brahe, Opera, vol. 8, p. 305:1–3.

4 Kepler, Gesammelte Werke, vol. xi.2, p. 196: “(…) wann ich allein das jenige
einbringen soke, was der Himmel gibt, so ware mit calculierung einer Ephemeridis

-257-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Limits of Influence: Pico, Louvain, and the Crisis of Renaissance Astrology
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 320

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.