Buffalo Soldier Regiment: History of the Twenty-Fifth United States Infantry, 1869-1926

By John H. Nankivell | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VIII
AN APPRECIATION OF THE REGIMENT’S WORK IN TEXAS, 1870–1880—
COMMENDATORY ORDER FROM COMMANDING OFFICER, DIS-
TRICT OF PECOS—GENERAL ORD’S RECOMMENDATIONS—THE
REGIMENT MOVES TO THE DEPARTMENT OF DAKOTA—MOVE TO
FORT SNELLING—ABANDONMENT OF FORT HALE—AN INSPECTION
REPORT.

The record of the regiment’s ten years of service in Texas (18704880) is not, on the whole, an exceptionally eventful one, but it is one of hard work cheerfully done and duty well performed, and that these services were appreciated by the powers that be, let the following order testify:

Headquarters District of the Pecos
Fort Concho, Texas, February 7, 1881.

In pursuance of orders this day received, abolishing all Military Districts in the Department of Texas, the undersigned relinquishes command of the District of the Pecos.

In doing so it is proper to refer to the services rendered by the officers and soldiers of the 10th Cavalry, and those of the 24th and 25th Infantry, who participated in the arduous work and active field operations of the past three years.

In addition to the work at posts and sub-posts on barracks and quarters, and in guarding mails and other public property throughout the district, over one thousand miles of wagon roads and three hundred miles of telegraph lines have been constructed and kept in repair by the labor of the troops, a vast region thoroughly scouted over, minutely explored, its resources made known, and wonderfully developed.

The distance marched by companies and detachments during the three years specified, as shown by the records, foots up the grand total of one hundred and thirty-five thousand seven hundred and ten (135,710) miles.

Much credit is due the troops who took part in the hard work, explorations, active scouting, expeditions against the Mescalero Apaches, and especially to those engaged in the campaign against Victorio and his band of hostile Indians who were outmarched, outmaneuvered, repeatedly headed off, disconcerted, met face to face, squarely fought, severely punished, driven into Mexico, badly crippled and demoralized, where—no longer able to hold together as an organized force—they fell an easy prey to the attack of the Mexican troops and Indian scouts from the Sierra Madre.

A settled feeling of security, heretofore unknown, prevails throughout western Texas, causing a rapid and permanent increase of population and wealth of the state, which is gratifying to citizens, and the military who have been instrumental in bringing about this very satisfactory condition of affairs.

The value of all this work to the great state of Texas, as cited herein, can hardly be overestimated.

Earnest efforts in the conscientious discharge of duty always lead to lasting results, aid civilization, and leave marks and impressions which never can be effaced, and in the end seldom fail to be rewarded.

Strong encomiums have been received from the late Department Commander, General E. O. C. Ord, some of which have been promulgated to the command, and no doubt the annual district report, tabular statement, and excellent map, lately forwarded—giving details of military operations for the past year, and embodying much important information, will be duly appreciated and valued by the present Department Commander, General C. C. Augur, and those in higher authority.

-35-

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