Buffalo Soldier Regiment: History of the Twenty-Fifth United States Infantry, 1869-1926

By John H. Nankivell | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XII
AN UNEVENTFUL PERIOD—CHANGES OF STATION COMPANIES A, C, D
AND E—THE RENAISSANCE IN TRAINING METHODS—AN INSPEC-
TION REPORT—THE TWENTY-FIFTH INFANTRY BICYCLE CORPS-
GARRISON LIFE DURING THE PERIOD, 1894–97.

The period that intervened between the return of the various companies of the regiment from strike duty in August, 1894, until the outbreak of the Spanish American War in April, 1898, was an uneventful one. Changes of station were made by the following companies during the period:

Companies C and E, from Fort Buford, N. D., to Fort Assiniboine, Mont., October, 1895.

Companies A and D, from Fort Custer, Mont. (abandoned), to Fort Harrison, Mont., November, 1897.

On December 31, 1897, the regiment was distributed in posts throughout Montana as follows:

Headquarters Companies B, F, G and H, and skeletonized Companies I and K, at Fort Missoula, Mont.

Companies A and D, at Fort Harrison, Mont.
Companies C and E, at Fort Assiniboine, Mont.

During this “uneventful” period the regular army, as a whole, benefitted by a decided improvement in the various garrison and service schools, small arms, and drill regulations. The graduates from Leavenworth were beginning to return to their regiments, and were being afforded the opportunity of trying out the results of their courses at the school.

The tactical training of all units began to show a commendable degree of improvement, and efforts were made throughout the country to assemble the scattered units of a regiment for the purpose of giving practice in command during field exercises and maneuvers to the field officers.

The Twenty-fifth Infantry shared the benefits of these improvements with the rest of the army, and frequent mention is made in the regimental returns of the period of practice marches and “exercises pertaining to the various duties incident to service in presence of or in contact with the enemy.” The new order of things received enthusiastic support from Colonel Burt, and it is due to his energetic policies that the regiment attained a standard of training and discipline that was to stand it in good stead in the coming campaign.

Inspection reports of this period are almost fulsome in their praise of the discipline and efficiency of the regiment, and the following sample is but one of many similar reports:

Headquarters 25th Infantry,
Fort Missoula, Mont., November 1, 1895.


CIRCULAR

The Colonel commanding takes pleasure in publishing for the information of the Regiment the following communication received from the Inspector General’s Office:

War Department
Inspector General’s Offiice
Washington, D. C. October 19, 1895

Colonel A- S. Burt 25th United States Infantry, Fort Missoula, Mont.

Sir:

The following extract from the report of an inspection of Fort Missoula, Mont.,

-58-

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