Buffalo Soldier Regiment: History of the Twenty-Fifth United States Infantry, 1869-1926

By John H. Nankivell | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XV
A CHANGE OF CAMP—SICKNESS—HOMEWARD BOUND—THE REOR-
GANIZATION OF THE REGIMENT—ORGANIZATION OF COMPANIES
I, K, L AND M—STATIONS IN THE DEPARTMENT OF THE COLO-
RADO—THE PHILIPPINE INSURRECTION—PREPARATIONS FOR THE
PHILIPPINES—DEPARTURE FOR THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS—REPORT
ON THE OPERATIONS OF THE REGIMENT IN THE PHILIPPINES-
GENERAL GRANTS REPORT—SCOUTING IN THE PHILIPPINES.

Soon after the surrender of Santiago the regiment moved to the high ground of the El Cobre ridge in rear of the trenches where it remained until its departure for the United States on August 13, 1898.

The hardships of the campaign had a telling effect on the health of the entire 5th Corps, and the days immediately succeeding the surrender saw more than half the command down with fever. The 25th Infantry was severely hit, and that the sick rate was not still higher was due to the energetic measures taken by Lieutenant Colonel Daggett in establishing as sanitary a camp as the circumstances permitted. Private Charles L. Taliaferro, Company H, died on July 30, 1898, and it was with a huge sigh of relief that the regiment finally boarded the S. S. Comanche for its return to the homeland.

Arriving at Montauk Point, Long Island, N. Y., on August 22, 1898, the regiment went into camp at Camp Wikoff, L. I., and the wonderful effects of the change of climate soon began to show in the improved health and spirits of the entire command.

Many important changes were to take place in the organization of the regiment while at Camp Wikoff, and by the end of September the regiment was on the move to its new stations in the Department of the Colorado. The regimental returns show the changes in organisation and stations to be as follows:

September: On the 26th, Companies I and K were reorganized and Companies L and M were organized by transfer from other companies in the regiment under the provisions of G. O. 21, A. G. O., 1898.

September 29th, the regiment, under command of Major M. Hooton, 25th Infantry, left Camp Wikoff, L. I., enroute to stations in the Department of the Colorado.

October: Headquarters and Companies I, K, L and M, under command of Major Hooton arrived at Fort Logan, Colo., October 3, 1898.

During the month the other companies of the regiment arrived at and took stations as follows:

Companies A and H, at Fort Huachuca, Arizona Territory.
Company B, at Fort Apache, Arizona Territory.
Company C, at San Carlos Agency, Arizona Territory.
Companies D and G, at Fort Grant, Arizona Territory.
Company E, at Fort Wingate, N. M., Territory.
Company F, at Fort Bayard, N. M., Territory.

November and December: No change.

Strength of the Regiment on December 31, 1898:

Note—Colonel A. S. Burt rejoined the regiment December 31, 1898; honorably discharged as Brigadier General, U. S. Volunteers same date.

-85-

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