Buffalo Soldier Regiment: History of the Twenty-Fifth United States Infantry, 1869-1926

By John H. Nankivell | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XX
SERVICE IN HAWAII—RECORD OF EVENTS 19134918—CHANGES IN OR-
GANIZATION OF THE REGIMENT—ORGANIZATION OF HEAD-
QUARTERS, MACHINE GUN AND SUPPLY COMPANIES—CALLS UPON
THE REGIMENT FOR OFFICERS AND NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS
FOR THE NEW ARMIES—CHANGES IN COMMANDING OFFICERS—
THE REGIMENT MOVES TO ARIZONA, AUGUST, 1918.

Service in Hawaii did not differ very much from garrison life in the United States, and there was the usual routine of drill, ceremonies, fatigue, guard duty, practice marches, and maneuvers. The climate was delightful, and although the cantonment at Schofield Barracks occupied by the regiment was not the last word in modern building construction, nevertheless it was fairly comfortable and presented quite an attractive appearance when embowered in the prolific tropical vegetation of Hawaii.

The bathing beaches nearby were a source of much enjoyment to the entire regiment, and many parties of both officers and enlisted men were formed to visit the far-famed volcanoes of Kilauea and Mauna Loa on the island of Hawaii.

A random perusal of the regimental returns of the period reveals the following “Events” as meriting some notice:


1913

September: The entire regiment, 36 officers and 1,104 enlisted men under command of Colonel Lyman W. V. Kennon, 25th Infantry, left Schofield Barracks, September 1, on an eight (8) days practice march around the island of Oahu, H. T., and marched as follows:

September 1st: left Schofield Barracks at 7:13 a. m., and marched to Pearl City, arriving at latter place at 12:10 p. m. Distance marched, 12.5 miles. September 2nd: left Pearl City at 6:35 a. m., and marched to Honolulu, arriving at latter place at 10:50 a. m. Distance marched 10.8 miles. September 3rd: left Honolulu at 7:05 a. m., and marched to Heeia, arriving at latter place 11:15 a. m. Distance marched 11 miles. September 4th: left Heeia at 6:30 a. m. and marched to Kaaawa, arrived at latter place at 10:10 a. m. Distance marched 8.5 miles. September 5th: left Kaaawa at 6:30 a. m. and marched to Laie, arriving at latter place at 10:15 a. m. Distance marched 10.8 miles. September 6th: left Laie and marched to Lyman’s Ranch, arriving at latter place at 1:00 p. m. Problem solved during the march. Distance marched 10 miles. September 7th: left Lyman’s Ranch at 6:30 a. m. and marched to Kawailoa, arriving at latter place at 8:40 a. m. Distance marched 7.5 miles. One enlisted man drowned while in camp (Private Paul Elzey). September 8th: left Kawailoa at 6:30 a. m. and marched to Schofield Barracks, arriving at latter place at 10:20 a. m. Distance marched 11.2 miles.

The 3rd Battalion left post at 5:30 a. m. September 15th on six (6) days field exercise, returned to post at 9:30 a. m., September 20th. Total distance marched about 60 miles.

The 2nd Battalion left post at 5:30 a. m. September 22nd on a six (6) days field exercise. Returned to post at 6:30 a. m., September 27th. Total distance marched about 41 miles.

October: The regiment as a part of the First Hawaiian Brigade was encamped near Jones’ Station, H. T. from October 10th to 22nd inclusive, where it participated in field exercises under direction of the Brigade Commander during that period. Broke camp at 7:00 a. m. October 23rd, and proceeded on practice march with the First Hawaiian Brigade on the East Coast of the Island of Oahu, marching as follows: October 23rd, from Schofield Barracks to Kawailoa, distance 11.2 miles; October 24th from Kawailo to Laie Point, distance 17.5 miles; October 25th, from Laie Point to Kualoa distance 14 miles; October 26th from Kualoa to Kaneche Creek, distance, 13.8 miles; October 27th from Kaneche Creek to Waimanaloa, distance 11 miles. From October 27th to 29th, the regiment participated

-139-

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