Buffalo Soldier Regiment: History of the Twenty-Fifth United States Infantry, 1869-1926

By John H. Nankivell | Go to book overview

APPENDIX H

TRANSLATION OF AN EDITORIAL IN A MONTEREY (MEXICO) PAPER
DATED SEPTEMBER 7, 1878

(Official Organ of the Government of the State of Nuevo Leon, Mexico)

Monterey, Saturday, Sept. 7, 1878.


EDITORIAL

The fortunate manner by which the revolution which had commenced to develop itself in this part of the frontier has satisfactorily terminated. General Trevino, with the forces under his command and the auxiliary troops that are being raised in the towns, will be exclusively devoted to the destruction of the Lipan and Mescalero Indians, who by their frequent raids are giving pretexts to the neighboring nation for difficulties with ours.

The general government, with the prudence which up to now it has treated the questions relative to this subject, insists on this measure for the good of the country; and this, at the same time, will put a stop to the unjust invasion of our territory by Americans.

The Indians, whose extermination will be undertaken, are the marauders whom the press, unfriendly to this country, are making such an outcry against, and trying to bring about a rupture between the two countries, for the purpose of making capital; not, as exaggerated or expressed by the Texans, who are the ones that complain, it is nevertheless also true that in Mexico they burn the pastures and destroy the cornfields, rob and murder wherever they go, and afterwards take refuge on American territory.

These Indians are the common enemies of both nations, and ought to be followed up until exterminated. They are not Mexicans, as some Texan periodicals, who hate Mexico, wrongly assert, but barbarians, savages, who rob and murder all that are not of their color and of their species, indifferent whether they be Mexicans or Americans—eternal enemies of propriety and of social institutions. It is some time since they have been pursued, and an opportunity is sought for their entire extermination or banishment from our country, but as they have a thorough knowledge of the country, of the deserts, and rugged lands where they always have lived this has rendered it an easy matter for them to evade pursuit. Our government, with this in view for many years past, have tried by other means to colonise them on the lands nearest to their villages; and this neither has given the result desired, because the frequent and distressing trials which the Mexican nation have been subjected to has prevented the formation of these colonies, and has scarcely been able to maintain a small force in each frontier State, sufficiently large to guarantee security to the settlers.

Now, that the idea of so many years will be carried out in a serious and definite manner, we await good results therefrom, and the attainment of many advantages in the same connection; therefore, with the destruction of these bands of savages, who have caused so much distress, and continue yet to cause by their raids in the States of Durango, Chihuahua, and even in Coahuila, the great losses and numerous misfortunes caused by these terrible enemies, in process of time will be prevented; likewise the guarantee to give security to those who wish to cultivate those desert lands, so fertile and rich for agricultural purposes, which certainly up to now have not been worked, because the prevalence of the savages or their frequent visits to those places has rendered their cultivation dangerous and almost impossible. Also the effect of this determination will result in the aggrandisement of the population of the Mexican frontier deserts; because in them are many sources of wealth, that were, and are yet, untouched and unexplored.

And, lastly, this resolution will convince those who have believed the official speculators and enemies of Mexico that our government is impressed with the best and most positive desire to be in accord with that of the United States, and prevent the expediting of the orders that lead to abuse by those whose duty it is to execute them, which being

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