Buffalo Soldier Regiment: History of the Twenty-Fifth United States Infantry, 1869-1926

By John H. Nankivell | Go to book overview

APPENDIX K

Headquarters, Second Brigade,
Second Division, Fifth Corps
July 5, 1898.

The Adjutant General,

2nd Division, 5th Army Corps.

Sir:

I have the honor to submit the following preliminary report of the part taken by my command in the battle of Caney, July 1, 1898. When time and opportunity permits I desire to submit a fuller supplementary report on the same subject.

The command consisting of the 25th and 4th regiment of infantry (the 1st Infantry had been detached as support for Capron’s battery), left El Pozo at daylight, July 1, and halted at Marianage for about one hour (6:30 to 7:30). During that time the command felt the ground toward Ducret House, on the Caney-Santiago road. From there reconnoitering parties were sent to the front, and on our right and left of Ludlow’s brigade, eventually finding the 2nd Massachusetts Regiment, with which I was ordered to connect and hold my command in reserve. At the junction of the Maruanhe trail with the Santiago-Caney road I remained until General Lawton, at 11:30 a. m., ordered the brigade to take position on the right of Ludlow’s Brigade. We were detained in reaching our position by troops in front blocking the road. We came into action directly in front of the stone blockhouse at 12:30, and from that hour until about 4:30, when the command to “cease firing” was given, the blockhouse having been captured, my brigade was continuously under fire.

The attack was begun by two companies in each regiment on the firing line, strength’ ened by supports and reserves from the remaining companies until the brigade had tut two companies left in reserve. At one time in this hotly engaged contest the commanding officer, 25th Infantry, sent me word that he needed troops on his right. I then sent forward 40 Cubans, under command of Captain Jose Vargas and Avelens Bravo, with Lieutenants Nicolas Franco and Tomas Repeloa, to form on the right of the 25th Infantry, which was also the right of the brigade. With these Cubans I ordered Private Henry Downey, Company H, 1st Infantry, on duty as Interpreter at the headquarters. These men advanced on the stone fort without line, fighting gallantly, during which Lieutenant Nicolas Franco was mortally wounded and died soon afterwards.

The brigade advanced steadily with such scanty cover as the ground afforded, maintaining a heavy fire on the stone fort from the time the fight began until it ended.

As the brigade advanced across a plowed field in front of the enemy’s position, the tatter’s sharpshooters in the houses in Caney enfiladed the left of our line with a murderous fire. To silence it Major Stephen Baker, 4th Infantry, in command of the battalion of that regiment on the left of our line of battle, directed it to turn its fire upon that town. In so doing this battalion lost heavily, but its steady front and accurate volleys greatly assisted the advance of the remainder of the brigade upon the stone fort.

With regard to tactical employment of the regiments of this brigade, a line of skirmish’ ers was formed direct from close order, at a distance of about 1,600 yards, and advanced through dense underbrush and three wire fences for about 600 yards. During this advance the brigade was under a heavy fire from an enemy who could not be seen; but the coolness displayed during this period is worthy of special mention.

The gallant conduct of all officers of this brigade, coming under my personal observation, was so marked that it would be unjust to make special mention of any of them. Attention is, however, directed to the reports of the regimental commanders, herewith inclosed.

-195-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Buffalo Soldier Regiment: History of the Twenty-Fifth United States Infantry, 1869-1926
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 248

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.