Buffalo Soldier Regiment: History of the Twenty-Fifth United States Infantry, 1869-1926

By John H. Nankivell | Go to book overview

APPENDIX M

MILITARY RECORD,
BRIGADIER GENERAL AARON S. DAGGETT,
U. S. ARMY, RETIRED

Brigadier General A. S. Daggett, U. S. Army, Retired, was born June 14, 1837, at Greene Corner, Maine. He is descended from a paternal ancestry which can be traced, with an honorable record, as far back as 1100 A. D. His mother was Dorcas C, daughter of Simon Dearborn, a collateral descendant of General Henry Dearborn. His more immediate ancestors came from old to New England about 1630, and both his grandparents served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War. He was educated in his native town at Monmouth Academy, Maine Wesleyan Seminary, and Bates College. At the outbreak of the Civil War he enlisted as a private, April 27, 1861, in the 5tn Maine Infantry; was appointed 2nd Lieutenant May 1, and promoted 1st Lieutenant May 24, 1861. He commanded his company at the first Bull Run battle, and was promoted Captain August 14, 1861.

From the first engagement of the regiment to the end of its three years’ memorable service, Captain Daggett proved a faithful and gallant soldier. He was promoted major, January 8, 1863; on January 18, 1865, was commissioned lieutenant colonel of the 5th Regiment, United States Veteran Volunteers, Hancock’s Corps, and was brevetted Colonel and brigadier-general of volunteers, March 13, 1865, for “gallant and meritorious services during the war.” He also received the brevets of Major in the United States Army for “gallant and meritorious services at the battle of Rappahannock Station, Va.,” November 7, 1863, and Lieutenant-Colonel for “gallant and meritorious services in the battle of the Wilderness, Va.” Immediately after the battle of Rappahannock Station, the captured trophies, flags, cannons, etc., were escorted by those who had been most conspicuous in the action, to General Meade’s headquarters, Colonel Dagget being in command of the battalion of his brigade. General Upton to whom he owed this distinction, wrote of him as follows:

“In the assault at Rappahannock Station, Colonel Daggett’s regiment captured over five hundred prisoners. In the assault at Spottsylvania Court House, May 10, his regiment lost six out of seven captains, the seventh being killed on the 12th of May at the “angle,” or point where the tree was shot down by musketry, on which ground the regiment fought from 9:30 a. m. to 5:30 p. m., when it was relieved. On all these occasions Colonel Daggett was under my immediate command, and fought with distinguished bravery.

“Throughout his military career in the Army of the Potomac, he maintained the character of a good soldier and an upright man, and his promotion would be commended by all those who desire to see courage rewarded.”

General Upton also wrote to the Governor of Maine as follows:

I would respectfully recommend to Your Excellency, Major A. S. Daggett, formerly 5th Maine Volunteers, as an officer highly qualified to command a regiment. Major Daggett served his full term in this brigade with honor both to himself and State, and won for himself the reputation of being a brave, reliable and efficient officer. His promotion to a colonelcy would be a great benefit to the service, while the honor of his state could scarcely be entrusted to safer hands.”

He was subsequently recommended for promotion by Generals Meade, Hancock, Wright and D. A. Russell. He was in every battle and engagement in which the 6th Corps, Army of the Potomac was engaged, from the first Bull Run to Petersburg, and was twice slightly wounded. On July 28, 1866, without his knowledge or solicitation, he was appointed a captain in the U. S. Regular Army, on recommendation of General Grant. During his subsequent career he has won the reputation of being a fine tactician and of

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