Self Care Theory in Nursing: Selected Papers of Dorothea Orem

By Katherine McLaughlin Renpenning; Susan G. Taylor | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 17 Nursing: A Dilemma for Higher Education

It is an honor to be a participant in the Centennial Academic Convocation of Incarnate Word College. I have come to know the work and reputation of the college since the year 1959 when I had my first contacts with Sr. Charles Marie Frank, who was at the time the Dean of the School of Nursing, The Catholic University of America. As a faculty member and program director for educational administration in nursing, I was associated with graduates of Incarnate Word College: Sister Teresa Stanley, Hector Gonzalez, Marine Cadena, Carolyne Patino, and others. Later I served as consultant during various phases of the curriculum revision project. I also participated in the development of a self-test for public health nurses, a federally sponsored project of the college. During the period of my consultations, I became aware that the college was confronted with the same issues and questions as were other four-year colleges and the universities. In the District of Columbia and the Maryland areas, I saw colleges close and colleges survive and renew themselves. Factors, internal as well as external to these institutions, affected the making of the decision to close college doors or keep them open. Since the 1960s much has been written about the situation of higher education in our country, with special references to the colleges and universities. The internal situation of these institutions, as well as the import of the changed and changing social and political scenes, has been explored, described, and explained in the literature. Prescriptions for action have been offered, sometimes with hope and sometimes with considerable despair. For example, Stephen Mueller,

This paper was originally presented as part of the centennial celebrations of Incarnate Word
College, San Antonio, Texas, 1982.

-142-

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