Successful Aging through the Life Span: Intergenerational Issues in Health

By May L. Wykle; Peter J. Whitehouse et al. | Go to book overview

PART II
What Constitutes Successful
Aging?

Diana L. Morris

The first chapter in this section deals with the beneficial effects of exercise for the elders, while the second focuses on the importance of maintaining a health diet. Both diet and exercise help the aging process, promote health and have been shown to halt physical deterioration and often improve bodily functioning. In the third chapter, the authors describe a model of successful aging that is applied to elders who are impacted by the effects of chronic illness. The section addresses ways that elders can take care of themselves to avoid or reduce the negative effects of aging.

The first chapter by Roberts and Adler examines the health effects of exercise for elders. Although many neglect to exercise regularly, it is known that exercise activities can provide many beneficial effects, such as improved cardiovascular functioning, muscle strength, balance, minimization of existing physical impairments, and promote mental health. On the other hand, health problems can arise and intensify without the benefit of regular exercise. The authors assert that it is ideal for older adults to exercise with partners, and emphasize intergenerational exercise in families, where support and encouragement is readily available. Identified in the chapter are three types of exercise: aerobic, muscle strength-training, and flexibility or range of motion activities, each providing respective

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