Psychological Interventions in Times of Crisis

By Laura Barbanel; Robert J. Sternberg | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 9
When a Benevolent Servant
Becomes a Malevolent Dictator
A Dark Side of Nuclear Technology

Donna Macomber and Elena L. Grigorenko

Through the release of atomic energy, our generation has brought into the
world the most revolutionary force since prehistoric man’s discovery of fire.
This basic force of the universe cannot be fitted into the outmoded concept
of narrow nationalisms. For there is no secret and there is no defense; there
is no possibility of control except through the aroused understanding and
insistence of the peoples of the world. We scientists recognize our ines-
capable responsibility to carry to our fellow citizens an understanding of
atomic energy and its implication for society. In this lies our only security
and our only hope—we believe that an informed citizenry will act for life
and not for death.

Albert Einstein, 1947


INTRODUCTION: THE ACCIDENT

Nuclear energy supplies over 16% of the world’s electricity. Simply stated, nuclear energy generates electricity by boiling water to make steam, which then drives turbine generators. There are currently 440 nuclear reactors operating in 31 countries worldwide, the majority of which are located in the United States (104), followed by France (59), Japan (53), Russia (30), and the United Kingdom (27) (World Nuclear Association). In theory, nuclear energy has a distinct environmental advantage over fossil fuels in that it does not

-181-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Psychological Interventions in Times of Crisis
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 290

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.