4
EXPERIMENT IN DEMOCRACY

IN THE CAMPAIGN of 1942, many young people under the age of twenty-one took an active interest. They drew the fire of the spellbinders stumping for my opponent. The young men and young women in the colleges of Georgia were aroused by the loss of accredited status of the institutions. Many of them already were in uniform; many men were waiting calls from their draft boards; but between their interest in the war and their class work, they found time to canvass thousands and thousands of Georgia homes and ask neighbors and relatives and friends, and strangers they had never seen before, to vote for me and rebuke the demagogues who had attacked education.

As the campaign neared its close even the educator and the Negro found themselves supplanted, as denunciatory objects, by the "irresponsible young jackanapes and painted-faced little girls who think they know how to run Georgia." Worse names were used in private. Somehow it never occurred to the experienced and versatile management of my opponent's campaign

-51-

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The Shore Dimly Seen
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 7
  • 1 - THE PARADOX THAT IS THE SOUTH 11
  • 2 - EXPORTING ILLITERACY 29
  • 3 - DEMAGOGUES IN THE DARK 39
  • 4 - EXPERIMENT IN DEMOCRACY 51
  • 5 - LAND LAID WASTE 62
  • 6 - 13,000,000 AMERICANS 83
  • 7 - THE INGREDIENTS OF FASCISM 107
  • 8 - PROPHETS OF DOOM 123
  • 9 - A SIX-POINT PROGRAM 141
  • 10 - OUR COMMON COUNTRY 150
  • 11 - OUR COLONIAL REGIONS 165
  • 12 - THE MONOPOLIST'S NIGHTMARE 186
  • 13 - MAKING FREE ENTERPRISE WORK 208
  • 14 - THE ROLE OF THE STATES 225
  • 15 - A MODERN STATE CONSTITUTION 247
  • 16 - JOBS AND GOVERNMENT 259
  • 17 - PEACE AND PUBLIC OPINION 272
  • 18 - "OUR REALIZATION OF TOMORROW" 289
  • 19 - THE SHORE DIMLY SEEN 306
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