13
MAKING FREE ENTERPRISE WORK

NEWNAN WAS A good town, even in the bad days that came after the War Between the States. Although it was but forty miles from Atlanta, General Sherman was not successful in interrupting its affairs on his march to the sea. It cared for a fair number of refugees from Atlanta, after the Union Army's carelessness with fire reduced that rail center to cinders. It suffered under Reconstruction, but not so severely as some other communities. It was one of the first in Georgia, at any rate, to become enthusiastic over the possibility of manufacturing things in the New South.

Grandfather Henry Arnall was on hand to help get industrialism started in the town. As a boy he had made money selling gingerbread to Federal soldiers. He arrived from the small country village of Senoia soon after the war and went into business on something less than a shoestring with a general farm-supply store. He was thrifty, industrious, imaginative, and a little lucky.

-208-

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The Shore Dimly Seen
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 7
  • 1 - THE PARADOX THAT IS THE SOUTH 11
  • 2 - EXPORTING ILLITERACY 29
  • 3 - DEMAGOGUES IN THE DARK 39
  • 4 - EXPERIMENT IN DEMOCRACY 51
  • 5 - LAND LAID WASTE 62
  • 6 - 13,000,000 AMERICANS 83
  • 7 - THE INGREDIENTS OF FASCISM 107
  • 8 - PROPHETS OF DOOM 123
  • 9 - A SIX-POINT PROGRAM 141
  • 10 - OUR COMMON COUNTRY 150
  • 11 - OUR COLONIAL REGIONS 165
  • 12 - THE MONOPOLIST'S NIGHTMARE 186
  • 13 - MAKING FREE ENTERPRISE WORK 208
  • 14 - THE ROLE OF THE STATES 225
  • 15 - A MODERN STATE CONSTITUTION 247
  • 16 - JOBS AND GOVERNMENT 259
  • 17 - PEACE AND PUBLIC OPINION 272
  • 18 - "OUR REALIZATION OF TOMORROW" 289
  • 19 - THE SHORE DIMLY SEEN 306
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