101 Sample Write-Ups for Documenting Employee Performance Problems: A Guide to Progressive Discipline & Termination

By Paul Falcone | Go to book overview

#74 Excessive, Unscheduled Absence

This is the second in a series of three write-ups. Note the FMLA notice, Consequences language, and Personal Commitment agreement in which the employee acknowledges that his job is in jeopardy of being lost.

PERFORMANCE CORRECTION NOTICE
Employee Name:Tom DolanDepartment:Marketing
Date Presented:October 21, 2010Supervisor:Jim McDonnell
Disciplinary LevelVerbal Correction—(To memorialize the conversation.)Written Warning—(State nature of offense, method of correction, and action to
be taken if offense is repeated.)Investigatory Leave—(Include length of time and nature of review.)Final Written Warning
□. Without decision-making leave
□. With decision-making leave (Attach memo of instructions.)
□. With unpaid suspension

Subject:Excessive, unscheduled absence

⊠ Policy/Procedure Violation

⊠ Performance Transgression

□ Behavior/Conduct Infraction

⊠ Absenteeism/Tardiness

Prior Notifications

Level of DisciplineDateSubject
Verbal10/15/10Unscheduled, unauthorized absence
Written_____________________________________________________
Final Written_____________________________________________________

-326-

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