101 Sample Write-Ups for Documenting Employee Performance Problems: A Guide to Progressive Discipline & Termination

By Paul Falcone | Go to book overview
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#93 Summary Discharge: Threatening a Coworker with Bodily Harm

May 18, 2010

Mary Beth Kaline
3000 Peachtree Road
Atlanta, GA 30326

Dear Mary Beth,

As we discussed over the phone, our company will no longer be able to employ you as
a security guard. After completing an investigation regarding a coworker’s complaints
about you and your complaints about the coworker, I have determined that your
behavior was inappropriate and that it potentially could have created a hostile work
environment.

I base my findings on the fact that you admitted to Telecommunications Supervisor
Denise King that you did indeed make threatening faces at this coworker. You stated
to Supervisor King that “if this had occurred anywhere but here, I would have beat the
shit out of her.”

You also repeated this threat in writing to me in your letter dated May 15, 2010. You
wrote in that letter explaining your side of the story that “if we were outside, I would
take matters into my own hands.” Such direct or veiled threats of violence violate
company standards of performance and conduct and preclude us from continuing
your employment relationship with this organization.

Thank you for your weekend “on-call”1 services over the past two years. If you have
any questions or would like to discuss this further, please call me at 555-555-5555.

Sincerely,

Michael Shanahan
Director of Security

1 An “on-call,” also known as a “standby,” employee does not work a specified schedule but is available to
respond to calls to work as needed. Such workers typically do not receive employer-sponsored benefits, and
there is generally less of a need to provide formal due process because of the casual nature of the employment
relationship. (In other words, you would be less obligated to follow the verbal–written–final written paradigm
for on-call workers than for regular full- or part-time workers.) Although it could be argued that a twenty-year,
full-time employee might not be summarily dismissed for this very same incident, most employers retain the
flexibility to consider the worker’s employment status when administering discipline.

-372-

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