101 Sample Write-Ups for Documenting Employee Performance Problems: A Guide to Progressive Discipline & Termination

By Paul Falcone | Go to book overview

#101 Summary Discharge: Credit Card Fraud

An employee who drives a company vehicle charges gasoline costs to the company for a different (i.e., personal) vehicle.

February 28, 2010

Tadashi Asaka
11111 North Crescent Drive
El Segundo, CA 90245

Dear Tadashi,

This letter is to inform you that you are hereby terminated from our company effective
immediately for credit card fraud.

Your gasoline credit card reveals the following activity over the past two months:

On December 10, 2009, 33.5 gallons of gas were charged to your company credit card.

On January 20, 2010, 40.5 gallons of gas were charged.

On February 8, 2010, 41 gallons of gas were charged.

However, your vehicle fills up only to a maximum of 30 gallons. It is clear that the
charges above were consequently not made for your company vehicle. During an
investigatory meeting that took place this morning, you were not able to explain why
the gas credit card statement indicated that you were filling up a 30-gallon tank with
more than 30 gallons of gas.

As a result, your employment is hereby terminated for dishonesty and falsification of
company records. You will receive your final check shortly in the mail1 in addition to
information regarding benefits continuation.

Sincerely,

Jan Lamb
Director, Fleet Operations

1 Note that in certain states and jurisdictions, you may have to keep your employee on your payroll until you
can provide that individual with a final check for all time worked. In such cases, you may want to extend the in-
dividual’s employment until you’ve had enough time to print and overnight the check. In this case, your
internal records may show a date of termination of March 2 or March 3. That’s not just being a good corporate
citizen; it’s a cheap insurance policy against a nasty wage and hour violation.

-382-

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