Evaluation and Testing in Nursing Education

By Marilyn H. Oermann; Kathleen B. Gaberson | Go to book overview

Preface

All teachers at some time or another need to measure and evaluate learning. The teacher may write test items, prepare tests and analyze their results, develop rating scales and clinical evaluation methods, and plan other strategies for assessing learning in the classroom, clinical practice, online and distance education courses, and other settings. Often teachers are not prepared to carry out these tasks as part of their instructional role. This second edition of Evaluation and Testing in Nursing Education is a resource for teachers in nursing education programs and health care agencies and a textbook for graduate students preparing for teaching roles, for nurses in clinical practice who teach others and are responsible for evaluating their learning and performance, and for other health professionals involved in evaluation, measurement, and testing. While the examples of test items and other types of evaluation methods provided in this book are nursing-oriented, they are easily adapted to assessment and evaluation in other health fields.

The purposes of the book are to describe concepts of evaluation, measurement, and testing in nursing education; qualities of effective measurement instruments; how to plan for classroom testing, assemble and administer tests, and analyze test results; how to write all types of test items and develop evaluation strategies; methods for evaluating higher level cognitive skills and critical thinking; how to evaluate written assignments in nursing; clinical evaluation and how to evaluate clinical performance; social, ethical, and legal issues associated with evaluation and testing; grading; and program evaluation. The content is useful for teachers in any setting who are involved in evaluating others, whether they are students, nurses, or other types of health personnel.

Chapter 1 addresses the purposes of evaluation and measurement in nursing education and provides a framework for evaluating students and other learners. Differences between formative and summative evaluation and between normand criterion-referenced measurement are explored. Since effective evaluation requires a clear description of what and how to evaluate, the chapter describes the use of objectives as a basis for developing test items and evaluation strategies, provides examples of objectives at different taxonomic levels, and describes how test items would be developed at each of these levels. Some teachers, however,

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