Blue-Ribbon Babies and Labors of Love: Race, Class, and Gender in U.S. Adoption Practice

By Christine Ward Gailey | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

A project of this duration and complexity involves so many people who enabled, enriched, encouraged, and otherwise helped me in the process. I owe much to Jennifer Wells, adoption advocate and family counselor, who guided my first research into adoption and with whom I spent many a fruitful hour discussing the politics and dynamics of adoption. Rosemary Broadbent offered her insights and experience in looking at the adoption process itself. Rachel Port got involved in the adoption research from the outset, and we became friends as well as fellow travelers: I am grateful to her for our dozens of kitchen table talks and so much more. I thank the many participants in the research project, who have been more than generous with their time and experiences. Some of the interviews were painful, others thrilling, many poignant, all of which helped me reexperience the intensity that sometimes accompanies research. I hope that these adopters and their families find the results useful, even at points where they might disagree with my interpretation of the narratives.

Colleagues in the Association of Black Anthropologists gave me counsel and insight into child rearing in a racist society and the kinship dynamics of race identity in adolescence. The framing of the chapter on transracial adoption owes much to Lynn Bolles, Cheryl Mwaria, and Angela Gilliam, as well as Jennifer and Tim Welles, Ida Susser, Karen Brodkin, Ethan NasreddinLongo, and Enoch Page. Mary Anglin helped me realize the significance of the research on parenting older girls for feminist theorization of gendered violence. Heléna Ragoné pushed the argument regarding infertility and ideologies of adoptive motherhood in ways that were very productive. Ida Susser heard many of the arguments in the formative stages and helped me concentrate on the most salient issues; I deeply appreciate her editorial suggestions. My conversations with Lisa Edelsward on similarities and differences between adoption in the United States and Canada and about recent research

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Blue-Ribbon Babies and Labors of Love: Race, Class, and Gender in U.S. Adoption Practice
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 185

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.