Blue-Ribbon Babies and Labors of Love: Race, Class, and Gender in U.S. Adoption Practice

By Christine Ward Gailey | Go to book overview

NOTES

CHAPTER ONE

1. In addition, I interviewed one white woman who had adopted a young boy from a country in southern Africa where she had worked with an NGO for years. The boy’s mother, who had been a co-worker and close friend, had contracted AIDS from her husband and been rejected by both her family and his before her death. The woman I interviewed had adopted the son as an international adoption through an agency that normally only did adoptions for the state, but where one of the social workers was a good friend. Because of the highly unusual circumstances, I did not count her in either the public adopter or international adopter groups, but I did include her in the discussions of transracial adoption.

2. All quotes are from interviews conducted during the field research. I assured anonymity for all those interviewed, including name, exact age of the adopter, and city of residence. Names, where given, are invented but consistent throughout the manuscript. Adopters agreed for themselves and their children to be identified by the racial or ethnic category they ascribed to themselves or their children.


CHAPTER TWO

1. Some of the quotes and materials on single-mother adopters also appear in my essay “‘Whatever They Think of Us, We’re a Family’: Single Mother Adopters,” in Adoptive Families in a Diverse Society, ed. Katarina Wegar (New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2006), 162–174.


CHAPTER THREE

1. Such race and class hierarchies have operated to privilege whites in other countries as well. Recently, protest from Aboriginal groups in Australia have called attention to “the stolen generation.” From 1918 until the 1970s, lighter-colored aboriginal children or

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