Drug War Zone: Frontline Dispatches from the Streets of El Paso and Juaarez

By Howard Campbell | Go to book overview

Epilogue and Conclusion

As the agent hauled the heavy steel door open and the overwhelming smell of
marijuana enveloped us, we stepped inside. About sixty feet long and thirty
feet wide, the room is stuffed with hundreds of bags, packets, suitcases and
bricks of marijuana; black tar heroin; cocaine; pills; and hallucinogens. The
parcels were stacked helter-skelter, one on top of the other almost to the ceiling.
The four chain-link cages on one side of the room are not sufficient to hold the
hundreds of packages, so the room is almost inaccessible because the entryway is
also stacked almost 10 feet high with caramel-colored taped bundles. The smell
permeates our clothes, and the federal agent jokes that U.S. Customs might
detain us for the intense smell wafting out of the car. We ask the street value of
the drugs in the storage room and the agents speculate it to be in the millions of
dollars
.
LEELA LANDRESS, EL PASO TIMES, JUNE 1, 2008, DESCRIBING THE
STOR AGE FACILITY CONTAINING ILLEGAL DRUGS CONFISCATED BY THE
MEXICAN ATTORNEY GENER AL’S OFFICE IN CIUDA D JUÁREZ


Juárez Drug War, 2008

As of December 2008, Ciudad Juárez remains a drug war zone. In January, the DEA arrested the second-in-command of the Juárez police force as he made arrangements for a drug deal with an undercover narc in an El Paso parking lot, and a series of startling revelations and violent reprisals followed. In early spring, Juárez investigators unearthed fortysix cadavers buried under the patios of two Juárez cartel safe houses.1 Bloody shoot-outs and vicious executions occur daily as the Chapo Guzmán cartel of Sinaloa attempts to usurp the plaza of the Carrillo

-265-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Drug War Zone: Frontline Dispatches from the Streets of El Paso and Juaarez
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 310

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.