Leon Uris: Life of a Best Seller

By Ira B. Nadel | Go to book overview

9
IRELAND

The Irish are about as fouled up as the Jews and it’s going to
take me at least one thousand pages to set them straight.

—URIS TO IRVING STONE, 1974

URIS WAS NOT far off. It took him 751 pages to tell the story of Ireland in Trinity (1976), a novel that sold more than five million copies and stayed on the New York Times best-seller list for one hundred weeks. Preceding it was Ireland: A Terrible Beauty, coauthored with Jill. His interest in Ireland began in 1968, when he was in England to research QB VII. He had taken note of the Irish Troubles largely because the BBC nightly reported on the destruction and mayhem caused by sectarian violence.

As mentioned earlier, Uris and Jill stayed in Ireland over a nine-month period (May 1972–January 1973) so that Uris could conduct research for a new novel. Their visit coincided with one of the most violent years of the Troubles. Four hundred seventy-two people died; there were more than 10,500 shootings. Eighteen hundred bombs were planted, more than 41,000 pounds of explosives were found, and 531 people were charged with terrorist offences.1 Of course, the violence in Northern Ireland began before the Urises arrived. On 30 January 1972, fourteen unarmed men were shot dead by a British paratrooper regiment in Derry after a large civil rights rally. This became known as Bloody Sunday, which created a wave of anger throughout the Roman Catholic community (the protesters were Catholic, the soldiers mostly Protestant). The events of Bloody Sunday “definitely piqued [Uris’s] interest in writing a book,” Jill remarked.2

Uris and Jill lived through security curfews, bomb warnings, and other dangers. Visiting Derry just after several bombs exploded, they found themselves close to a gunfight. Dramatic photographs of a bombed-out grocery shop and car dealership appear in Ireland: A Terrible Beauty. In Belfast, they had to evacuate their hotel because of a bomb threat, which turned out to be a car bomb that was defused on the street. They were caught on a “border” street between Catholic and Protestant neighborhoods in Belfast when a gunfight broke out, and they had to hug the walls while Jill photographed the scene.3

-209-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Leon Uris: Life of a Best Seller
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Abbreviations viii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Prologue - [American Marine, Jewish Writer] 1
  • 1 - [the Truth Will Rise] 10
  • 2 - Eagle, Globe, and Anchor 29
  • 3 - Battle Cry at Larkspur 52
  • 4 - Hollywood 72
  • 5 - Exodus, or [the Book] 93
  • 6 - History and Resistance 123
  • 7 - Love and Litigation 169
  • 8 - [Short Titles, Long Books, Big Sales] 193
  • 9 - Ireland 209
  • 10 - Return 233
  • 11 - Russian Renewal 255
  • 12 - Redemption, or America Redux 280
  • Epilogue 303
  • Notes 305
  • Index 343
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 352

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.