Spanish Texas, 1519-1821

By Donald E. Chipman; Harriett Denise Joseph | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

In fall 1984, Randolph B. “Mike” Campbell urged Donald E. Chipman, his colleague at the University of North Texas, to take an active role in writing entries on colonial Texas for The New Handbook of Texas, then targeted for publication in the mid-1990s. It was a fortuitous suggestion. Initially, Chipman approached the early history of the Lone Star State as a part of colonial Mexico, or New Spain. In writing entries for the New Handbook of Texas, he soon saw the need for a one-volume synthesis of the Spanish experience in Texas and its continuing legacies in the Lone Star State. The result was Spanish Texas, 1519–1821 (1992), an award-winning publication. Initially, we wish to express appreciation to Mike for opening the vistas of Texas’s colonial history, and for his assistance in improving the first and second editions of this book.

Since 1984 we have received aid and encouragement from many individuals and institutions. Remembering them and expressing our gratitude is one of the more pleasant aspects of writing a book.

In spring 1990, Chipman received a Faculty Development Leave from the University of North Texas (UNT) that permitted him to conduct research in Spanish archives. He also received grants from UNT’s Faculty Research Committee to cover airfare expenses, map preparation, and photo duplication.

Off campus, Chipman was assisted by a grant from the Ottis Lock Foundation that helped underwrite research expenses at the Barker Texas History Center (now the Center for American History) and the Nettie Lee Benson Latin American Collection in Austin. In Spain, doña Rosario Parra Cala of the Archivo General de Indias and doña Esperanza Salán Paniagua of the Archivo Central y Biblioteca del Ministerio de Economía y Hacienda and their staffs provided courteous and vital assistance. Professor Joseph W. McKnight of the Southern Methodist University School of Law and Professor Emeritus Thomas N. Campbell of the Department of Anthropology at the University of Texas at Austin read parts of the first edition manuscript

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Spanish Texas, 1519-1821
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 368

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.