Mining Archaeology in the American West: A View from the Silver State

By Donald L. Hardesty | Go to book overview

Introduction

Mining and miners left an enduring legacy in the history and landscape of the American West (Smith 1987; Robbins 1994; Hine and Faragher 2000; Paul 2001; Isenberg 2006). Indigenous peoples mined minerals such as salt and turquoise in the region before the arrival of Europeans in the 1500s. Spanish explorers and settlers searched for the mythical El Dorado and opened mineral and metal mines in what is now the Southwest and Southern California. They introduced mining technologies and methods developed earlier in medieval Europe and other parts of New Spain. The discovery of gold in California in 1849 led to the first global mining rush in the American West (Holliday 1999). More mining rushes followed with gold strikes on the Fraser River in British Columbia and on Pikes Peak in Colorado in the late 1850s (Fetherling 1997). The discovery of the famous Comstock Lode in Nevada in 1859 spurred the industrialization of mining and revolutionized mining technology, society, and culture throughout the world (James 1998). Subsequent mining rushes took place during the next few decades in the Cariboo region of British Columbia; on Nevada’s Reese River and Treasure Hill; in the Black Hills of South Dakota; at Bannack and Alder Gulch in Montana; at Leadville and Cripple Creek in Colorado; and at Idaho’s Clearwater River, Boise Basin, and Owyhee Mountains, among other places. The end of the nineteenth century and beginning of the twentieth heralded the last of the famous global mining rushes in the American West: the Klondike Gold Rush in Alaska (Morse 2003) and the gold strikes at Tonopah, Nevada, in 1900 and at nearby Goldfield, Nevada, in 1902 (Elliott 1966; Zanjani 1992, 2002). Mining for base metals and minerals such as copper and iron played an equally prominent role in the history of the American West in the twentieth century (Hyde 1998).

Nevada’s mining frontier is a microcosm of the western mining experience and is the focus of this book. Sporadic and small-scale mining took place in what is now Nevada before the expansion of the American state. In the late 18th century, Spanish Franciscan monks traveling on

-xiii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Mining Archaeology in the American West: A View from the Silver State
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Introduction xiii
  • 1- Traveling into Nevada's Mining Past 1
  • 2- The Archaeology of Mining Technology 29
  • 3- The Social Archaeology of Mining 109
  • 4- Conclusions - Understanding Variability and Change on the Mining Frontier 179
  • References Cited 189
  • Index 203
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 221

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.