Reservation Reelism: Redfacing, Visual Sovereignty, and Representations of Native Americans in Film

By Michelle H. Raheja | Go to book overview

3
Tears and Trash
Economies of Redfacing and the Ghostly Indian

On January 4, 1999, Iron Eyes Cody died in his modest Silver Lake bungalow in Los Angeles at the age of ninety-four. A Wild West show recruiter, motion picture actor, stuntman, production crew member, and cultural consultant for almost eight decades, Cody began his career at the age of twelve and starred in hundreds of films (often in uncredited roles) as wide-ranging as Custer’s Last Stand (1936), Union Pacific (1939), The Paleface (1948), Broken Arrow (1950), A Man Called Horse (1970), and Ernest Goes to Camp (1987), and in television series such as Rawhide, Gunsmoke, The Waltons, and Fantasy Island. Best known for his role as the crying Indian in the televised 1971 Keep America Beautiful Inc. (KAB) public service announcement, Cody became, for many people throughout the world, the quintessential symbol of the American Indian. In the announcement he weeps bitter tears about the destruction of the environment; he appears as a stoic and silent wise elder; and he wears the mid-nineteenth-century Plains accoutrements — the beads, buckskins, and braids, long

-102-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Reservation Reelism: Redfacing, Visual Sovereignty, and Representations of Native Americans in Film
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 338

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.